Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

Data: Cooperation and Collaboration Efforts

December 21st, 2012 by Mary Wood

One particular slide from Furlough’s talk is especially noteworthy. 

Research Libraries and “Big Data” 

(made available from Penn State ScholarSphere, much like UC eScholarship

Mike Furlough
Penn State University Libraries
CENDI/NFAIS Workshop
December 11, 2012 Washington, DC 

 

DataONE, Data Conservancy and Data to Insight Center funded by NSF DataNet 

. 

MetaArchive dark preservation archive and GeoMAPP preservation of local/state government spatial data  funded by Library of Congress’ NDIIPP program 

. 

  

National Digital Stewardship Alliance, which includes members from academia, industry, and government, convened to work on Content Standards and Practices Infrastructure Innovation Outreach 

. 

DataCite develop mechanisms to assign persistent, unique identifiers to datasets so that they can be cited 

. 

Digital Preservation Network >75 universities contributed to fund an investigation of a national preservation network 

. 

 Chronopolis at SanDiego, HathiTrust, the Data Conservancy all have slightly different approaches to data storage and transfer 

DuraSpace.org, Digital Public Library of America DPLA, Committee on Institutional Cooperation CIC, Mercury, and Academic Preservation Trust 

On
this
screen
you
see
several
examples
of
the
kind
of
collaboration
I’m
talking
about.
DataOne,
Data
Concervancy
and
Data
to
Insight
Center
have
all
been
funded
by
NSF
through
DataNet.
MetaArchive,
a
dark
preservation
archive
making
use
of
peer-­‐to-­‐
peer
technology,
and
GeoMAPP,
focsed
on
the
preservation
of
local/state
government
spatial
data
were
both
funded
by
Library
of
Congress’s
NDIIPP
program.
There
are
new
ones
emerging
all
the
time.
The
Library
of
Congress’s
NDIIPP
program
has
given
rise
to
the
National
Digital
Stewardship
Alliance,
which
includes
members
from
academia,
industry,
and
government,
convened
to
work
on
Content
|
Standards
and
Practices
|
Infrastructure
|
Innovation
|
Outreach.
DataCite
is
an
organization
founded
by
several
European
national
libraries
and
including
some
North
American
libraries
to
work
with
the
publishing
industry
to
develop
the
mechanisms
to
assign
persistent,
unique
identifiers
to
datasets
so
that
they
can
be
cited.
The
Digital
Preservation
Network
is
the
newest
and
perhaps
the
most
ambitious.
Over
75
universities
have
contributed
at
least
$20k
to
fund
an
investigation
of
a
NATIONAL
preservation
network.
Two
strategies
of
DPN
worth
noting
are:
Preservation
in
enhanced
not
just
through
replication/storage,
but
by
replicating/storing
in
a
diversity
of
repository
infrastructures.
Chronopolis
at
San
Diego,
Hathi
Trust,
the
Data
Conservancy
all
have
slightly
different
approaches
to
data
storage
and
transfer.
Relying

15-year-old’s medical breakthrough thanks to open access data

December 19th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell

The Chronicle of Higher Education recently published an article stressing the importance of open access data:

“This year a high-school student in Maryland announced that he had invented a diagnostic test for pancreatic cancer. The test costs three cents per use. It works 168 times as fast and more than 400 times as accurately as the best previously existing test. It also may be able to detect ovarian and lung cancers.

Jack Andraka, the inventor, is 15 years old. His cancer test is more than a medical triumph. It is also a triumph for open access, the goal of a decade-old movement to replace an obsolete and inefficient scholarly publication industry with something better for everybody: a system that allows anyone with a computer and an Internet connection free access to results of academic and scientific research—most of it paid for by taxpayers.”

Read the full article.

Image courtesy PGRsOnline via Flickr.

WHO’s Global Health Observatory furthering open access to data

December 18th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell

The World Health Organization is currently working towards expanding their collection of public access data under their Global Health Observatory website. From WHO:

“Improvements are under way at WHO’s online Global Health Observatory (GHO) making health data easier to find and use for specialists such as statisticians, epidemiologists, economists and public health researchers as well as anyone with an interest in global health.

The GHO is the ‘one-stop shop’ for the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of up-to-date health data. It provides free public access through a single internet page to a vast reservoir of data and analyses on the situation and trends for global health priorities, integrating around 1000 health indicators.”

Read more about this amazing resource at the Global Health Observatory.

Image courtesy Waleed Alzuhair via Flickr.

Cleveland Clinic announces top 10 medical innovations of 2013

December 17th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell

From Irishtimes.com:
“Technologies to diagnose bacterial disease, scan for melanoma and tackle headaches are among the hottest tickets in healthcare innovation for 2013

Each year the renowned Cleveland Clinic in Ohio brings together physicians to gaze into their (admittedly well informed) crystal ball, and evaluate what are likely to be the hot tickets for healthcare innovation in the coming year.

Approaches that make the Cleveland Clinic’s Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2013 include technologies to tackle headaches, to diagnose bacterial disease, to scan non-invasively for melanoma and even to boost the number of lungs available for transplant.”

Read the full article.

See the Cleveland Clinic’s Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2013.

Image courtesy jnpoulos via Flickr

Nurse Residency Programs: Communication and Compassion

December 12th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell


Nurse Residency programs are post-baccalaureate programs aimed at not only honing nursing skills among participants, but also help to improve the communication skills of graduates. These programs provide tools for dealing with situations where communication is important, such as demonstrating compassion to a patient and their family.

Rachele Khadjehturian, director of the Graduate Nurse Residency Program at New York Presbyterian Hospital, comments, “…interprofessional communication is not a required course in many curriculums, and new nurses and residents have to learn to work together on the job. Unless we teach residents and interns empathy as well as technical skills, it’s hard to know where the future of medicine is headed.”

UC Davis’ own Nursing Residency program stresses critical thinking, leadership skills, communication skills, and professional development, along with other technical aspects of the nursing career.

Find out more at the UC Davis Nursing Residency Program.

Overcoming the Obstacles to Research During Residency

December 12th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell

Just Published
Overcoming the Obstacles to Research During Residency: What Does It Take?
Michael B. Rothberg, MD, MPH
JAMA. 2012;308(21):2191-2192. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.14587

JAMA recently released an article addressing the difficulties that residents face while undergoing research in addition to their already busy schedules.

“…conducting research in residency is challenging, and insufficient scholarly activity remains a common reason for residency program citation. Authors have described research curricula or research rotations, but there is little empirical evidence for specific elements of a successful resident research program. Surveys of program directors4 and residents reveal barriers to research during residency: insufficient resident interest, limited resident time, paucity of mentors, limited faculty time, lack of resident research skills, absence of a research curriculum, and inadequate funding. Although formidable, these obstacles can be overcome with sufficient resources and determination.”

Read the full article over at JAMA.

Image courtesy suttonhoo via Flickr.

Image searching (Open-i) from the National Library of Medicine

December 11th, 2012 by Bruce Abbott

The National Library of Medicine has released a beta version of a freely available search engine that provides searching of images from the full-text collection PMC (formerly PubMed Central).

The link to the website is: http://openi.nlm.nih.gov/index.php

From the website:
Open-i lets users retrieve not only the MEDLINE citation information, but also the outcome statements in the article and the most relevant figure from it. Further, it is possible to use the figure as a query component to find other relevant images or other visually similar images. Future stages aim to provide image region-of-interest (ROI) based querying. The initial number of images is projected to be around 600,000 and will scale to millions. The extensive image analysis and indexing and deep text analysis and indexing require distributed computing. At the request of the Board of Scientific Counselors, we intend to make the image computation services available as a NLM service.

Vist our Frequently Asked Questions page for more information and help.

UC Davis’ Kyriacos Athanasiou awarded Nemitsas Prize.

December 11th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell

The Nemitsas Prize is given to Cypriot scientists who have excelled with inventions or discoveries either abroad, or in Cyprus. This year, it is being given to UC Davis’ very own Kyriacos Athanasiou, for the invention of a kit that can insert drugs into the body through the bones if the vein is inaccessible, such as if they have dehydration or are in shock. This technology was recently used in Haiti to stop a cholera epidemic.

From the Nemitsas Foundation:

“Professor Kyriacos A. Athanasiou was born and raised in Larnaka, Cyprus, and studied in United States where he is having a brilliant career. His discoveries in Biomedical Engineering Technology have had significant contribution to the development of products which save lives and improve the quality of life to millions of diseased people all over the world.

Professor Athanasiou’s legendary invention of delivering life-saving drugs through the bone of patients with no venous access has saved thousands of lives. His invention of a biodegradable implant is the first cartilage product to enter the market and is used globally.”

Image courtesy vistavision via Flickr.

Can medical students afford to choose primary care?

December 10th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell

Can medical students afford to choose primary care?

The December issue of Academic Medicine is now being distributed to subscribers and is available on-line. Articles from the January issue also are available on-line in the “Published Ahead of Print” section of the journal’s web page. A featured article in the January issue, “Can Medical Students Afford to Choose Primary Care? An Economic Analysis of Physician Education Debt Repayment,” is authored by James A. Youngclaus, MS, of the AAMC staff; and Paul A. Koehler, PhD, of State Street Corporation; and Laurence J. Kotlikoff, PhD, and John M. Wiecha, MD, MPH, of Boston University.

Links:
Featured Article
Academic Medicine

Image courtesy doctorwonder via Flickr.

Science.gov celebrates 10 year anniversary!

December 10th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell

Science.gov

“What is the gas mileage of your car? How much of your state is water covered? Where can you download software that will give atomic precision to your computer’s clock? These and many other questions can and have been answered by Science.gov – the Federal government’s “one stop” real-time science data website, which is now celebrating its 10th anniversary.”

Science.gov has been around since December 2002, and now with over 34 million pageviews a year, the website dedicated to providing a gateway into federal science information is doing a great job of continually growing a base for knowledge in it’s field.

Read more at the Press Release.