Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

Experimental Design and Statistics

January 14th, 2015 by Mary Wood

ILAR Journal Volume 55(3): Experimental Design and Statistics

ILAR_etoc.

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The review articles in this issue discuss current methods of animal research to address what can be done to improve the quality of animal experiments, choice of animal model, and the systematic review and meta-analysis of animal experiments.

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Select articles:

Festing, Nevalainen
Design and Statistical Analysis of Animal Experiments: Introduction to this Issue

Bailoo, Reichlin, Würbel
Refinement of Experimental Design and Conduct in Laboratory Animal Research

Nevalainen
Animal Husbandry and Experimental Design

Festing
Evidence Should Trump Intuition by Preferring Inbred Strains to Outbred Stocks in Preclinical Research

O’Connor, Sargeant
Critical Appraisal of Studies Using Laboratory Animal Models

Hooijmans, IntHout, Ritskes-Hoitinga, Rovers
Meta-Analyses of Animal Studies: An Introduction of a Valuable Instrument to Further Improve Healthcare

de Vries, Wever, Avey, Stephens, Sena, Leenaars
Usefulness of Systematic Reviews of Animal Experiments for the Design of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

Garner
Significance of Meaning: Why Do Over 90% of Behavioral Neuroscience Results Fail to Translate to Humans, and What Can We Do to Fix It?

Fry
Teaching Experimental Design

Festing
Randomized Block Experimental Designs Can Increase the Power and Reproducibility of Laboratory Animal Experiments

Parker, Browne
Place of Experimental Design and Statistics in the 3Rs

Pearl
Making the Most of Clustered Data in Laboratory Animal Research Using Multi-Level Models

and

Guidance for the Description of Animal Research in Scientific Publications
Committee members included Dr. Stephen W. Barthold (IOM), Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California, Davis

Project Tycho: Data for health

December 5th, 2013 by Amy Studer

Announcing Project Tycho™, a web site which provides open access to newly digitized and integrated data from the entire 125 years history of United States weekly nationally notifiable disease surveillance data since 1888.  Read more about it:

The goal of Project Tycho™ is to aid scientists and public health officials in the eradication of deadly and devastating diseases. A recent NEJM article, documents how the Project Tycho team digitized and made public all weekly surveillance reports of nationally notifiable diseases for U.S. cities and states published between 1888 and 2011. The project derived a quantitative history of disease reduction in the United States over the past century, focusing particularly on the effect of vaccination programs.

Reference

van Panhuis WG, Grefenstette J, Jung SY, Chok NS, Cross A, Eng H, et al. Contagious diseases in the United States from 1888 to the present.N.Engl.J.Med. 2013 Nov 28;369(22):2152-2158.

Project Tycho Image

About Project Tycho

In the United States, cases of contagious diseases have been reported at weekly intervals to health authorities for more than a century, but these data have not been publicly available in a computable format, so their use and value have been limited. The University of Pittsburgh has released a collection of surveillance reports about diseases in the United States going back 125 years. “The researchers obtained all weekly notifiable disease surveillance tables published between 1888 and 2013 – approximately 6,500 tables – in various historical reports, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. These tables were available only in paper format or as PDF scans in online repositories that could not be read by computers and had to be hand-entered. With an estimated 200 million keystrokes, the data – including death counts, reporting locations, time periods and diseases – were digitized. A total of 56 diseases were reported for at least some period of time during the 125-year time span, with no single disease reported continuously.”

Blog entry re-posted from Rudolph Mata Library Blog by medref@tulane.edu, with permission.

Trial for PolicyMap until November 30, 2013

September 24th, 2013 by Bruce Abbott

The library is offering a trial to PolicyMap–a mapping and data tool until November 30, 2013. Please evaluate it and compare it to our existing subscription to Social Explorer.

Access it directly here: http://ucdavis.policymap.com

Here’s a bit of info on Policy Map:

PolicyMap is an online (no software installation needed) US national data and mapping tool and analytics platform with varied applications for college students and faculty. It is used in undergraduate and graduate curriculums and research related to social sciences, urban studies, real estate and housing analysis, community and economic development, public administration, public health, policy and political science, education, business, economics, statistics, and geography, among others. In the academic environment, PolicyMap enables students to concentrate on their subject matter rather than having to spend time learning a GIS tool. PolicyMap is web-based and geared toward users who may not be GIS experts but want to be able to analyze large amounts of data quickly and produce maps, tables, charts and reports with a minimal learning curve for the application itself.

Please send any comments to hslref@lib.ucdavis.edu

A Community of Contrasts: Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in California, 2013

February 8th, 2013 by Bruce Abbott

A new report presenting the latest data on the Asian American and Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPI) population has been made available by The Asian Pacific American Legal Center (APALC) and Asian Law Caucus (ALC); it provides data on population, population growth, and key social and economic data including income, poverty, education and language.

The site requires that you register to download the report, but it is freely available.

http://apalc.org/media-center/publications/community-contrasts-asian-americans-native-hawaiians-and-pacific-islande-0

2013 American Cancer Society statistics now available from CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians

January 30th, 2013 by Bruce Abbott

The annual statistics issue makes this journal the most highly cited publication by the ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.3322/caac.21166/abstract

View through VPN: https://vpn.lib.ucdavis.edu/doi/10.3322/caac.21166/,DanaInfo=onlinelibrary.wiley.com+full?dmmsmid=68441&dmmspid=5275764&dmmsuid=1815265

Data: Cooperation and Collaboration Efforts

December 21st, 2012 by Mary Wood

One particular slide from Furlough’s talk is especially noteworthy. 

Research Libraries and “Big Data” 

(made available from Penn State ScholarSphere, much like UC eScholarship

Mike Furlough
Penn State University Libraries
CENDI/NFAIS Workshop
December 11, 2012 Washington, DC 

 

DataONE, Data Conservancy and Data to Insight Center funded by NSF DataNet 

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MetaArchive dark preservation archive and GeoMAPP preservation of local/state government spatial data  funded by Library of Congress’ NDIIPP program 

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National Digital Stewardship Alliance, which includes members from academia, industry, and government, convened to work on Content Standards and Practices Infrastructure Innovation Outreach 

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DataCite develop mechanisms to assign persistent, unique identifiers to datasets so that they can be cited 

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Digital Preservation Network >75 universities contributed to fund an investigation of a national preservation network 

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 Chronopolis at SanDiego, HathiTrust, the Data Conservancy all have slightly different approaches to data storage and transfer 

DuraSpace.org, Digital Public Library of America DPLA, Committee on Institutional Cooperation CIC, Mercury, and Academic Preservation Trust 

On
this
screen
you
see
several
examples
of
the
kind
of
collaboration
I’m
talking
about.
DataOne,
Data
Concervancy
and
Data
to
Insight
Center
have
all
been
funded
by
NSF
through
DataNet.
MetaArchive,
a
dark
preservation
archive
making
use
of
peer-­‐to-­‐
peer
technology,
and
GeoMAPP,
focsed
on
the
preservation
of
local/state
government
spatial
data
were
both
funded
by
Library
of
Congress’s
NDIIPP
program.
There
are
new
ones
emerging
all
the
time.
The
Library
of
Congress’s
NDIIPP
program
has
given
rise
to
the
National
Digital
Stewardship
Alliance,
which
includes
members
from
academia,
industry,
and
government,
convened
to
work
on
Content
|
Standards
and
Practices
|
Infrastructure
|
Innovation
|
Outreach.
DataCite
is
an
organization
founded
by
several
European
national
libraries
and
including
some
North
American
libraries
to
work
with
the
publishing
industry
to
develop
the
mechanisms
to
assign
persistent,
unique
identifiers
to
datasets
so
that
they
can
be
cited.
The
Digital
Preservation
Network
is
the
newest
and
perhaps
the
most
ambitious.
Over
75
universities
have
contributed
at
least
$20k
to
fund
an
investigation
of
a
NATIONAL
preservation
network.
Two
strategies
of
DPN
worth
noting
are:
Preservation
in
enhanced
not
just
through
replication/storage,
but
by
replicating/storing
in
a
diversity
of
repository
infrastructures.
Chronopolis
at
San
Diego,
Hathi
Trust,
the
Data
Conservancy
all
have
slightly
different
approaches
to
data
storage
and
transfer.
Relying

WHO’s Global Health Observatory furthering open access to data

December 18th, 2012 by Ferguson Mitchell

The World Health Organization is currently working towards expanding their collection of public access data under their Global Health Observatory website. From WHO:

“Improvements are under way at WHO’s online Global Health Observatory (GHO) making health data easier to find and use for specialists such as statisticians, epidemiologists, economists and public health researchers as well as anyone with an interest in global health.

The GHO is the ‘one-stop shop’ for the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of up-to-date health data. It provides free public access through a single internet page to a vast reservoir of data and analyses on the situation and trends for global health priorities, integrating around 1000 health indicators.”

Read more about this amazing resource at the Global Health Observatory.

Image courtesy Waleed Alzuhair via Flickr.

Developing Data Attribution / Citation Practices & Standards

November 27th, 2012 by Mary Wood

For Attribution — Developing Data Attribution and Citation Practices and Standards
Summary of an International Workshop


..Paul F. Uhlir, Rapporteur
..Board on Research Data and Information
..Policy and Global Affairs
..National Research Council

..Read Full Text
..Jump to book’s table of contents to begin reading online for free

..The National Academies Press

Description:
The growth of electronic publishing of literature has created new challenges, such as the need for mechanisms for citing online references in ways that can assure discoverability and retrieval for many years into the future. The growth in online datasets presents related, yet more complex challenges. It depends upon the ability to reliably identify, locate, access, interpret, and verify the version, integrity, and provenance of digital datasets. Data citation standards and good practices can form the basis for increased incentives, recognition, and rewards for scientific data activities that in many cases are currently lacking in many fields of research…

The problem of citing online data is complicated by the lack of established practices for referring to portions or subsets of data. There are a number of initiatives in different organizations, countries, and disciplines already underway. An important set of technical and policy approaches have already been launched by the U.S. National Information Standards Organization (NISO) and other standards bodies regarding persistent identifiers and online linking…    Read More

BioMed Central Requesting Public Consultation on Open Data

September 26th, 2012 by Deanna Johnson

BioMed Central is proposing to change the copyright license in their open access journals to make published data available for sharing, integration and reuse without legal restrictions, for the benefit of science. Implementation would mean that authors would apply a Creative Commons CC0 public domain waiver to data that is submitted for publication, and a Creative Commons attribution license to the remainder of their article. BioMed Central provides additional information on the BioMed Central blog and the full proposal is published in BMC Research Notes.

If you would like to comment to BioMed Central about their proposal send your feedback by 10th November 2012. You can also add a comment to the BioMed Central Blog.

EZID Summer 2012 Webinar

July 26th, 2012 by Mary Wood

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EZID Webinar

Who should attend: researchers and librarians supporting researchers
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Wed Aug 15, 2012
2:00 – 3:00pm
Speaker: Joan Starr
Location: Library Instruction Room LIR , 2nd floor, Shields Library

Do you manage or help others manage any kinds of digital objects, such as texts, data sets, terms, or images? Do you need an easy solution to citing and providing access to this kind of work?

EZID makes it simple for researchers and others to obtain and manage long-term identifiers (DOIs and ARKs) for their digital content. Citation information can also be associated with the identifiers, and this makes DOIs and ARKs powerful tools for tracking usage, getting credit for work, sharing data, and have it reused for more research.

In this free summer webinar, Joan Starr will cover:

why data citation and long-term identifiers are important to researchers;
how EZID can provide an easy-to-use, easy-to-implement identifier service for your institution;
an overview of EZID’s features;
and, how to get started

Joan Starr manages the EZID service for the California Digital Library (CDL), a service that makes it easy to create and manage unique, long-term identifiers. Joan is Chair of the Metadata Working Group at DataCite, an international organization working for easier access to and increased acceptance of research data in scholarly communications. She engages with a wide range of data management stakeholders, including researchers, libraries, data centers, archives and repositories. She is also Strategic and Project Planning Manager for the CDL.

More information about EZID