Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

BMJ Best Evidence [trial]

September 6th, 2016 by Amy Studer

BMJ Best Evidence

Blasidell Medical Library is sponsoring a trial of BMJ Best Evidence, an evidence-based point-of-care tool:

Give it a try: http://us.bestpractice.bmj.com/

Description (from BMJ website):

Best Practice is a decision support tool that combines the latest research evidence with guidelines and expert opinion. Incorporating a simple but comprehensive step-by-step process, you will have extensive access to the latest information including: Diagnosis, Prognosis, Treatment, and Prevention

The trial goes through September 30, 2016.

We would appreciate your feedback about this resource!  Here are some questions we have for you about BMJ Best Evidence:

  • How would you rate the quality of the content?
  • What do you like/dislike about the website design and user experience?
  • How does this compare to other products that are currently available to UCDHS clinicians, such as Essential Evidence Plus, UpToDate, and TRIP Premium?
  • How would you envision using this resource in your work (clinical care, teaching/learning, research)?

Please send comments to BML Librarians:     bmlref@ucdavis.edu    |    (916) 734-0206

Other Information:

Clinician tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbAOF4hijT0

Medical student tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBeOdTL4CVo

 

Library adds The Joanna Briggs Institute’s (JBI) Evidence Based Practice database of systematic reviews

May 31st, 2016 by Bruce Abbott

The JBI database is available from the following URL:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=n&CSC=Y&PAGE=main&D=jbi&MODE=easy

The Joanna Briggs Institute’s Evidence Based Practice database of systematic reviews complements those found in the Cochrane Library. The Joanna Briggs Institute, an international not-for-profit research and development organization, “develops evidence in various formats for nursing, allied health and medical professionals as well as support information for consumers.” It was established in Adelaide, South Australia in 1996, and collaborates internationally with over 70 entities world-wide.What is included in the Joanna Briggs Institute EBP Database:

The Joanna Briggs Institute EBP database is a comprehensive range of resources including over 3,000 records across seven publication types:

  • Evidence Summaries — Literature reviews that summarize existing international literature on common healthcare interventions and activities
  • Evidence-Based Recommended Practices — Database of procedures that describe and/or recommend practice on various clinical topics
  • Best Practice Information Sheets — Series of information guideline sheets produced specifically for practicing health professionals
  • Systematic Reviews — Comprehensive systematic reviews of international research literature completed by trained JBI reviewers
  • Consumer Information Sheets — Standardized summaries designed just for consumers of healthcare (patients, clients, and care providers)
  • Systematic Review Protocols — Developed by the Collaborating Centers of JBI, which are made up of international experts from over 40 countries from a range of health disciplines
  • Technical Reports — Documentation of all aspects of the development of Best Practice Information Sheets

TRIP (Turning Research Into Practice) Database Premium Trial — through 12/30/2015

November 19th, 2015 by Amy Studer
TRIP Evidence-Based Pyramid

From TRIP Infographic: https://www.tripdatabase.com/info/

 

Have you tried TRIP? 

The TRIP Database is a publicly available (free) clinical search engine that is “designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.”

TRIP results are organized with easy-to-use evidence based practice filters (e.g., systematic reviews, evidence-based synopses, practice guidelines) to help clinicians quickly identify relevant evidence.  Practice guidelines are drawn from professional, governmental, and non-governmental organizations and are filtered by country, offering a global perspective on practice.

 

From now until December 30, 2015, Blaisdell Medical Library is offering a trial of TRIP Database Premium.

Test TRIP Database Premium version:  https://www.tripdatabase.com/

[Trial accessible from networked campus computers, with remote access via the University Library VPN]

A few benefits of a paid TRIP Database Premium subscription:

  • * 100,000 more systematic reviews
  • * linking to UC Davis University Library’s licensed electronic resources, such as full-text articles
  • * enabled ability to export to citation management software

We are interested in your comments!  What do you think about this resource?  bmlref@ucdavis.edu

PLoS Medicine article: Good reasons to search in ClinicalTrials.gov

December 9th, 2013 by Amy Studer

A new article out of PLoS Medicine (December 6, 2013) provides some good reasons for adding ClinicalTrials.gov to the list of resources consulted routinely for evidence-based treatment decisions:

Riveros, C., et al., Timing and Completeness of Trial Results Posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and Published in Journals. PLoS Med, 2013. 10(12): p. e1001566.

Access at:  http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001566

The authors compared the reporting on clinical trials of drugs in ClinicalTrials.gov with corresponding journal publications for timeliness of publication and completeness (flow of participants, efficacy results, adverse events, and serious adverse events) of posted results.  Reporting in ClinicalTrials.gov was significantly more complete than in the published journal articles.

Accessing drug information from ClinicalTrials.gov may help address potential publication, reporting, and time-lag biases that have been identified in journal literature, thereby supplementing information gathering for evidence-based practice.  ClinicalTrials.gov is “designed to complement, not replace, the journal publication” because results are presented as tabular data, without interpretation, and are not peer-reviewed (Zarin, Tse, Williams, Califf, & Ide, 2011, page 3).

Reference:

Zarin, D. A., Tse, T., Williams, R. J., Califf, R. M., & Ide, N. C. (2011). The ClinicalTrials.gov results database–update and key issues. N Engl J Med, 364(9), 852-860. doi: 10.1056/NEJMsa1012065.

Links to Resources:

ClinicalTrials.gov website:  http://clinicaltrials.gov/

For help with finding information in ClinicalTrials.gov, contact hslref@lib.ucdavis.edu

Try searching for a drug by name in DailyMed, and then link to related ClinicalTrials.gov information from the menu on the left side of the page.