Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

Dr. Jonna Mazet (UC Davis) to Deliver 2016 NLM/MLA Leiter Lecture, May 4

April 20th, 2016 by Deanna Johnson

Jonna Mazet, DVM, MPVM, PhD, will give the 2016 Joseph Leiter National Library of Medicine (NLM)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Lecture, Wednesday, May 4. It will take place at 1:00 PM EST (10:00 AM PST) in Lister Hill Auditorium, on the first floor of NIH Building 38A.

leiter-lecture-2016-mazet_50   Her topic will be, “Emerging Infectious Diseases in the 21st Century: A Prevention Paradigm for Surveillance, Information Sharing, and Health Diplomacy.” The lecture, which is open to the public, will also be recorded and broadcast live on the Web (and is now archived) at: https://videocast.nih.gov.

..Mazet is professor of epidemiology and disease ecology, and executive director of the One Health Institute, at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, where she focuses on global health problem solving, especially for emerging infectious disease and conservation challenges. Currently, she is the global director of a $175 million viral emergence early warning project, PREDICT, that has been developed with the US Agency for International Development (USAID) Emerging Pandemic Threats Program. She was elected to the US National Academy of Medicine in 2013.

..The Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lecture was established in 1983 to stimulate intellectual liaison between the MLA and the NLM. Leiter was a major contributor in cancer research at the National Cancer Institute and a leader at NLM as a champion of medical librarians and an informatics pioneer. He served as NLM Associate Director for Library Operations from 1965 to 1983.

..Directions to NLM and details about visiting NLM and the NIH campus are available at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/psd/ref/guide/rrdirect.html. Sign language interpreters will be provided at the lecture.

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..For more information:
Stephen J. Greenberg, MSLS, PhD
Coordinator of Public Services
History of Medicine Division, NLM
301.827.4577
greenbes@mail.nih.gov

Lecture, October 7, “Integrating multi-scale data for biomedical discovery and clinical implementation”

October 1st, 2015 by Deanna Johnson

 

Lecture Presenter: Dr. Russell Altman

Lecture Presenter: Dr. Russell AltmanThe program will be videocast at: http://videocast.nih.gov/

The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the first annual Donald A.B. Lindberg & Donald West King Lecture on Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at 1:00 PM EDT in Masur Auditorium, Building 10 in Bethesda, MD. The inaugural lecture, which honors recently retired NLM Director Dr. Lindberg and former NLM Deputy Director of Research and Education Dr. King, is titled, “Integrating Multi-scale Data for Biomedical Discovery and Clinical Implementation.” It will be given by Russell Altman, MD, PhD, of Stanford University. Dr. Altman’s primary interests are in the field of bioinformatics. He is particularly interested in the analysis of protein and RNA structure and function, both in an individual problem-centered manner and on a functional genomic scale. Dr. Altman currently serves as a member of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD).

The program will be videocast at: http://videocast.nih.gov/

And archived for later viewing at: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=16888&bhcp=1

 

Access to Global Unique Device Identification Database

May 6th, 2015 by Mary Wood

NLM and FDA Launch Public Access to Global Unique Device Identification Databaseindex

The FDA and the National Library of Medicine announced that data submitted to FDA’s

Global Unique Device Identification Database (GUDID)

is now publicly available through a website called AccessGUDID

Search / download information that device labelers have submitted to the GUDID about their medical devices.

Because the UDI system is being phased in over the next several years, labelers are currently submitting data on only the highest risk medical devices, a small subset of marketed devices. But as the system is implemented according to the UDI compliance timeline, the records of all medical devices required to have a UDI will be included.

This is a beta version of AccessGUDID; after exploring its contents and assessing its functionality, please provide feedback in order to shape future enhancements, including advanced search and web services.  Submit feedback through the Contact Us link at the bottom of the AccessGUDID landing page or the FDA UDI Help Desk.

Ebola Outbreak Resources

September 22nd, 2014 by Bruce Abbott

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Information Management Research Center has created a web page,

Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/ebola_2014.html

NLM has activated the Emergency Access Initiative in support of medical efforts in West Africa.

Emergency Access Initiative: http://eai.nlm.nih.gov
NLM Launches Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Healthcare Professionals Fighting Ebola Outbreak.

GIDEON coverage of Ebola: http://web.gideononline.com/web/epidemiology/index.php?disease=10700&country=G100&view=Distribution  GIDEON (Global Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Online Network)  is used for diagnosis and reference in the fields of tropical and infectious diseases, epidemiology, microbiology and antimicrobial chemotherapy. Gideon is a licensed resource:  access through the VPN: https://vpn.lib.ucdavis.edu/web/epidemiology/index.php,DanaInfo=web.gideononline.com,SSO=U+?disease=10700&country=G100&view=Distribution

The Centers for Disease Control Ebola outbreak page:  http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/guinea/index.html.  In addition, the CDC has a general topic page on Ebola: http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/index.html

The World Health Organization has a web page on the outbreak: http://www.afro.who.int/en/clusters-a-programmes/dpc/epidemic-a-pandemic-alert-and-response/epr-highlights/4164-ebola-virus-disease-in-west-africa.html as well as a general topic page on Ebola http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/en/. This is the link to the WHO response page: http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/outbreak-response-plan/en/.

Update October 28, 2014:  Here is a resource guide from the University of Iowa:  http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/ebola

 

NCBI Workshops at UC Davis

August 9th, 2014 by Amy Studer

NCBI 2014 cropped

September 15 – 16, 2014

Presented by Peter Cooper, PhD & Wayne Matten, PhD
National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)

2205 Haring Hall

Pre-registration is complete. 

You are welcome to register on-site, 15 minutes prior to the start of each workshop.

This series of in-person workshops will focus on the following:

Monday, September 15, 2014:

9-11:30am             Navigating NCBI Molecular Data Using the Integrated Entrez System and BLAST

1-3:30pm               NCBI Genomes, Assemblies and Annotation Products: Microbes to Human

Tuesday, September 16, 2014:

9am-11:30am       Advanced NCBI BLAST

1-3:30pm               Gene Expression Resources at NCBI

Workshop format will include lecture and hands-on activities.  Participants are encouraged to bring laptops for practice sessions.  Workshops are free of charge and open to UC Davis faculty, students and staff, as well as others in the Sacramento region.  Guest wireless Internet access will be provided.

Printed handouts will NOT be provided.  Link to course materials:  http://1.usa.gov/1xgMv22

Questions?       Contact hsadmin@lib.ucdavis.edu

 

UC Davis Library Logo

 

For a detailed description of workshops:  Read the rest of this entry »

Genetic, health info added to NIH dbGaP

February 27th, 2014 by Mary Wood
33329

dbGaP – Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes

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Genetic Epidemiology Research on Aging (GERA)

NIH News

UCSF News

Researchers will now have access to genetic data linked to medical information on a diverse group of more than 78,000 people, enabling investigations into many diseases and conditions. The data, from one of the nation’s largest and most diverse genomics projects — Genetic Epidemiology Research on Aging (GERA) — have just been made available to qualified researchers through the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), an online genetics database of the National Institutes of Health.

The GERA cohort was developed collaboratively by Kaiser Permanente and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). The addition of the data to dbGaP was made possible with support from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute of Mental Health, and NIH.

dbGaP was developed and is managed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, a division of the National Library of Medicine. Investigators who are interested in applying for access to this database should follow the procedures on the dbGaP website. Specific information on the data can be found here.

2014 West Virginia Elk River Chemical Release: Information Resources

February 3rd, 2014 by Amy Studer

Adapted from NLM Tech Bull. 2014 Jan-Feb;(396):b5.:

You may be aware from multiple news sources that little information was available about 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol at the time of the spill in West Virginia’s Elk River in early January 2014.

Since the spill, government and private sector scientists have contributed to collecting and verifying information about the chemical.

Here are some new resources about the chemical and the government response:

Please note that in some social media and early news reports, the chemical was MISIDENTIFIED as Methylcyclohexanol (CASRN: 25639-42-3). This is NOT the correct chemical.

In chemical incidents, it is unusual for little online information to be available about a substance. Chemicals can often be readily identified using online resources such as TOXNET and WISER. In the absence of published information, local and state officials request consultation with local, state, federal and industry experts. Typically, following such an incident there is immediate, ongoing, extensive consultation and communication among responders and experts to determine appropriate actions.

When planning for providing health information following chemical incidents, it is critical for institutions and government agencies to know who to contact in uncommon situations as well as knowing the authoritative published sources of chemical information.

Sources

PMC Releases New ID Converter

November 19th, 2013 by Mary Wood

PMC (PubMed Central) has just released an upgrade to the ID converter:

PMCID – PMID -Manuscript ID – DOI Converter

This utility allows you to start with the unique identifier for an article that is in PMC, and find additional unique identifiers that may apply to the article.  Further details here.

Improvements include support for DOIs, auto-detection of the ID type based on its format, and enhanced output. It also provides output in any of several different formats: HTML, XML, JSON, or CSV.

This tool uses an underlying web service, that is also publicly available for those needing programmatic access to this data. ID Converter API documentation here.

pmc

PubMed Relevancy Sort

November 5th, 2013 by Amy Studer

PubMed now includes a new relevance sort option.

The “Relevance” sort option is available from the “Display Settings” menu under the “Sort by” selections.  Initially, easy access to relevance sort will also be provided under a “New feature” discovery tool (see red boxes on image).

The relevance sort order for search results is based on an algorithm that analyzes each PubMed citation that includes the search terms. For each search query, “weight” is calculated for citations depending on how many search terms are found and in which fields they are found. In addition, recently-published articles are given a somewhat higher weight for sorting.

PubMed Relevancy

For additional information, please visit the NLM Technical Bulletin.

This blog entry was adapted from NewsBits Blog from NN/LM Pacific Southwest Region, October 23, 2013.

A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI

May 3rd, 2013 by Amy Studer
DNA Molecule display, Oxford University

Image credit: By net_efekt. License: CC-BY 2.0

I had the wonderful experience of spending March and April enrolled in a new course sponsored by the National Library of Medicine:

A Librarian’s Guide to NCBI

We started with an online preparatory course, which culminated with a week of instruction on NCBI bioinformatics databases at NLM on the NIH Campus in Bethesda.

The course was taught by NCBI staff and Diane Rein, Ph.D., M.L.S., Bioinformatics and Molecular Biology Liaison from the Health Science Library, University at Buffalo.

The goal was to learn how to search within and across the NCBI bioinformatics resources, such as:

Also, we experimented with tools like:

I am interested in finding out more about how members of the UC Davis community are using and learning about these databases.   If you are currently using these databases for your research or want to learn more about them, please consider contacting me:

Amy Studer, Health & Life Sciences Librarian

astuder@lib.ucdavis.edu     |    530- 752-1678