Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

New MOU Among NIH, USDA, and FDA

June 7th, 2016 by Mary Wood

Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare – MOU Among USDA/FDA/NIH

NIH, USDA, and FDA have participated under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Concerning Laboratory Animal Welfare for over 30 years. Each agency, operating under its own authority, has specific responsibilities for fostering proper animal care and welfare. This agreement sets forth a framework for reciprocal cooperation intended to enhance agency effectiveness while avoiding duplication of efforts in achieving required standards for the care and use of laboratory animals.

The new MOU is available at: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/olaw/references/finalmou.htm.

This follows the earlier, similar MOU between NIH and NSF
(blog post)

New NIH-EPA research centers to study environmental health disparities

June 7th, 2016 by Mary Wood

Centers of Excellence on Environmental Health Disparities Research

The National Institutes of Health has partnered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to fund five new research centers to improve health in communities overburdened by pollution and other environmental factors that contribute to health disparities. Within each center, scientists will partner with community organizations to study these concerns and develop culturally appropriate ways to reduce exposure to harmful environmental conditions.

The centers will examine a range of stressors on health, including air, water, and ground pollution as well as environmental conditions such as sub-standard housing, poor diet, and adverse social dynamics.

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The new centers

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Boston University School of Public Health, will study how housing conditions may affect birth weight, childhood growth trajectories, and risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and whether improved urban housing may benefit health.

Johns Hopkins University, will compare urban and rural effects of poverty on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of improved dietary intake on preventing or mitigating disease progression.

University of Arizona, will work with indigenous populations to examine chemical contamination of traditional foods, water, air, and household environments, and increase environmental health literacy.

University of New Mexico, will examine how contact with metal mixtures from abandoned mines affects rural Native American populations through exposures related to inadequate drinking water infrastructure, reliance on local foods, and other uses of local resources to maintain their traditional lifestyle and culture.

University of Southern California, will study how environmental factors may contribute to childhood obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy in Hispanic and Latino communities.

Lecture, October 7, “Integrating multi-scale data for biomedical discovery and clinical implementation”

October 1st, 2015 by Deanna Johnson

 

Lecture Presenter: Dr. Russell Altman

Lecture Presenter: Dr. Russell AltmanThe program will be videocast at: http://videocast.nih.gov/

The National Library of Medicine is pleased to announce the first annual Donald A.B. Lindberg & Donald West King Lecture on Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at 1:00 PM EDT in Masur Auditorium, Building 10 in Bethesda, MD. The inaugural lecture, which honors recently retired NLM Director Dr. Lindberg and former NLM Deputy Director of Research and Education Dr. King, is titled, “Integrating Multi-scale Data for Biomedical Discovery and Clinical Implementation.” It will be given by Russell Altman, MD, PhD, of Stanford University. Dr. Altman’s primary interests are in the field of bioinformatics. He is particularly interested in the analysis of protein and RNA structure and function, both in an individual problem-centered manner and on a functional genomic scale. Dr. Altman currently serves as a member of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD).

The program will be videocast at: http://videocast.nih.gov/

And archived for later viewing at: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=16888&bhcp=1

 

Animal welfare MOU between NIH and NSF

August 12th, 2015 by Mary Wood

Notice of Memorandum of Understanding Between NIH and NSF Concerning Laboratory Animal Welfare
Notice Number: NOT-OD-15-139

Memorandum of Understanding
NIH and NSF operate under a MOU to ensure consistent and effective oversight of the welfare of animals used in activities funded by the NSF. The agreement provides a framework to enhance communication and harmonize the agencies’ efforts while reducing regulatory burden to supported institutions. nsf_logoEffective October 1, 2015, institutions receiving NSF support must:

include NSF-supported activities with live vertebrate animals as covered activities in their OLAW Animal Welfare Assurance;
promptly report situations involving NSF-supported animal activities to OLAW as required by the Public Health Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, Section IV.F.3.
.banner-nihlogoOLAW will:

negotiate new Assurances for institutions with pending NSF awards;
review and evaluate noncompliance reports and the actions taken involving NSF-supported activities; and
report findings to NSF.

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Background
OLAW is responsible for administration and implementation of the PHS Policy. The Policy requires institutions to establish and maintain proper measures to ensure the appropriate care and use of all animals involved in research, research training, and biological testing activities. Institutions receiving PHS funding through grants, contracts or cooperative agreements for research involving vertebrate animals are required to comply with the PHS Policy.

NSF holds its awardees responsible for the humane care and treatment of any vertebrate animal used or intended for use in such activities as field or laboratory research, development, training, experiments, biological testing or for related purposes supported by NSF grants, contracts or cooperative agreements. Any NSF awardee performing research on vertebrate animals must comply with the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) [7 U.S.C. 2131 et seq.], the AWA regulations [9 CFR 1.1-4.11], the PHS Policy, and the U.S. Government Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Training. The awardee must follow the guidelines described in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and the AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals.

NIH Notices to enhance reproducibility

June 12th, 2015 by Mary Wood

NIH issues NOTICES on proposed changes in grant application and peer review process

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NOT-OD-15-103 proposes changes in four areas deemed critical for enhancing rigor and transparency in NIH-funded research which are addressed in the proposed changes:

The scientific premise of the proposed research
Rigorous experimental design for robust and unbiased results
Consideration of sex and other relevant biological variables
Authentication of key biological and/or chemical resources

NOT-OD-15-102 provides further details on the expectation that investigators factor sex as a biological variable into the research design, analysis, and reporting components of grant applications involving vertebrate animal or human studies.

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The updates are currently pending approval by the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB). NIH expects to incorporate changes into funding opportunity announcements and the Standard Form 424 (Research and Related) Grant Application Guide in Fall 2015. The revisions will apply to grant applications submitted in January 2016 and beyond. Additionally, peer reviewer training starting in Spring 2016 will include the four highlighted areas of reproducibility.

June 9 blog post by Sally Rockey, NIH Deputy Director for Extramural Research, and Larry Tabak, Principal Deputy Director of NIH

NIH has created a site describing ongoing efforts in rigor and reproducibility.

from AAMC June 12 Washington Highlights

New NIH biosketch format May 25, 2015

May 12th, 2015 by Mary Wood

Notice Number: NOT-OD-15-032

New Biographical Sketch Format Required for NIH and AHRQ Grant Applications May 25, 2015
Research grant applications, career development, training grant, and all other application types should use the general Biographical Sketch Format Page and instructions and sample.
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Tool to Help Build the New Biosketchsciencv_2

SciENcv serves as an interagency system designed to create biosketches for multiple federal agencies, and supports the new biosketch format.

SciENcv pulls information from available resources making it easy to develop a repository of information that can be readily updated and modified to prepare future biosketches. A YouTube video provides instructions for using SciENcv.

Start Using SciENcv to Create and Maintain Your Biosketch Profiles

 

Three changes to the biosketch:

The allowed length has been increased from four to five pages.

Up to five of the applicant’s most significant contributions to science are to be included in section C. Description can include the impact of each, its context and the role of the applicant. The importance of each contribution can be underscored by up to four peer-reviewed publications, videos, patents, databases or other products.

A URL to the applicant’s publicly available bibliography may be provided.

The primary difference is section C. In SciENcv, you can add contributions and select citations to support them from your Bibliography. It also allows you to include a link to your complete Bibliography

Every researcher with a MyNCBI account has access to the MyBibliography and SciENcv tools. If you maintain MyBibliography as you publish and edit the settings to make it “Public,” you will be provided with a URL that you can share on your biosketch.

SciENcv is connected to MyBibliography, and you can directly import the citations you want into section C. To create the new biosketch in SciENcv, click on “Create New Profile.” You will be given three options—to create a profile from scratch, from an external source or from another profile. To minimize the amount of changes you need to make, if you have used SciENcv before, select “from another profile.” If you have an eRA commons account, you can use it as the external source. Both options auto-populate sections of your biosketch. In all cases the type of document that you should create is “New NIH Biosketch.”

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UCLA CTSI NIH Biosketch Tips  (includes recorded webinar)
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SciENcv: Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae

December 15th, 2014 by Mary Wood

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…  A researcher profile system for all individuals who apply for, receive or are associated with research investments from federal agencies.

SciENcv is a feature in My NCBI that helps you create online professional profiles that can be made public to share with others.

eRA Commons and ORCID account holders who have linked their accounts to My NCBI can have their SciENcv profiles automatically populated with the information stored in their biographical records.

.TrySciENcv

Library Guide on Author IDs and ORCID

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Earlier blog post re beta version, November 7th, 2013
SciENcv – Science Experts Nework
NIH Notice, NOT-OD-13-114

Neuroscience Nobelist Cajal Drawings at NIH

December 5th, 2014 by Mary Wood

As reported in the December 5 NIH Record, seven drawings of the Spanish scientist-artist Santiago Ramon y Cajal are now on exhibit at NIH, Porter Neuroscience Research Center.

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Photographic “tiles” that reproduce details of tissue slides that Cajal prepared

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Comparison of competing ideas about the composition of the nervous system.

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“These drawings by Cajal, who was an artist, anatomist and is considered the father of modern neuroscience, will be inspiring to the scientists who work here.”

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His advances in neuroanatomy, brain pathology and developments defining the nervous system led Cajal to provide evidence of “neuron doctrine,” which is the basis for modern neuroscience. Cajal shared (with Italian pathologist Camillo Golgi of “Golgi stain” renown) the 1906 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.

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“Cajal was able to show beautiful, elegant structures of individual neurons and link the structure of those neurons to their function.”

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The Cajal exhibit, developed and sponsored by Office of NIH History in the Office of Intramural Research, will be open through April.

Reporting Preclinical Research

November 5th, 2014 by Mary Wood

Proposed Principles and Guidelines for Reporting Preclinical Research

NIH held a joint workshop in June 2014 with the Nature Publishing Group and Science on the issue of reproducibility and rigor of research findings, with journal editors representing over 30 basic/preclinical science journals in which NIH-funded investigators have most often published. The workshop focused on the common opportunities in the scientific publishing arena to enhance rigor and further support research that is reproducible, robust, and transparent.

 

.NIHProposed Principles and Guidelines

The signatories represent journals that publish preclinical biological research — an area of research that encompasses both exploratory studies and hypothesis-testing studies, with many different designs. The journals agree to adhere to the following principles with the aim of facilitating the interpretation and repetition of experiments as they have been conducted in the published study. These measures and principles do not obviate the need for replication and reproduction in subsequent investigations to establish the robustness of published results across multiple biological systems.

  1. Rigorous statistical analysis
  2. Transparency in reporting
  3. Data and material sharing
  4. Consideration of refutations
  5. Consider establishing best practice guidelines for image based data, description of biological material

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Previous blog post on NIH, Nature and Reproducibility

ILAR Roundtable: Reproducibility issues in research with animals and animal models

Intersection of systematic review methodology with the NIH Reproducibility Initiative  EHP

NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing

September 7th, 2014 by Amy Studer

Image of Genomic Data Sharing Policy logo

On August 26, 2014, the National Institutes of Health has issued a final NIH Genomic Data Sharing (GDS) policy “to promote data sharing as a way to speed the translation of data into knowledge, products and procedures that improve health while protecting the privacy of research participants.”(NIH, August 27, 2014)

According to a post in The Chronicle of Higher Education, “The data-sharing policy, which will take effect with grants awarded in January, will give agency-financed researchers six months to load any genomic data they collect—from human or nonhuman subjects—into a government-established database or a recognized alternative.” (Basken, August 28, 2014)

References and Additional Information:

Basken, P. (August 28, 2014).  NIH Tells Genomic Researchers: ‘You Must Share Data.’  The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Accessed September 7, 2014, from http://chronicle.com/article/NIH-Tells-Genomic-Researchers-/148509/

National Institutes of Health Genomic Data Sharing Governance Committee. (2014). Data use under the NIH GWAS Data Sharing Policy and future directions. Nature Genetics, 46(9), 934-938. doi: 10.1038/ng.3062.  Retrieved September 7, 2014, from http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v46/n9/full/ng.3062.html

U.S. National Institutes of Health. (2014).  Genomic data sharing.  Accessed September 7, 2014, from http://gds.nih.gov/index.html

U.S. National Institutes of Health.  (August 27, 2014).  NIH Genomic Data Sharing Policy (NOT-OD-14-124).  Accessed September 7, 2014, from http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-14-124.html

U.S. National Institutes of Health. (August 27, 2014). NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing.  NIH News & Events Blog.  Accessed September 7, 2014, from http://www.nih.gov/news/health/aug2014/od-27.htm