Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

Animal welfare MOU between NIH and NSF

August 12th, 2015 by Mary Wood

Notice of Memorandum of Understanding Between NIH and NSF Concerning Laboratory Animal Welfare
Notice Number: NOT-OD-15-139

Memorandum of Understanding
NIH and NSF operate under a MOU to ensure consistent and effective oversight of the welfare of animals used in activities funded by the NSF. The agreement provides a framework to enhance communication and harmonize the agencies’ efforts while reducing regulatory burden to supported institutions. nsf_logoEffective October 1, 2015, institutions receiving NSF support must:

include NSF-supported activities with live vertebrate animals as covered activities in their OLAW Animal Welfare Assurance;
promptly report situations involving NSF-supported animal activities to OLAW as required by the Public Health Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, Section IV.F.3.
.banner-nihlogoOLAW will:

negotiate new Assurances for institutions with pending NSF awards;
review and evaluate noncompliance reports and the actions taken involving NSF-supported activities; and
report findings to NSF.

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Background
OLAW is responsible for administration and implementation of the PHS Policy. The Policy requires institutions to establish and maintain proper measures to ensure the appropriate care and use of all animals involved in research, research training, and biological testing activities. Institutions receiving PHS funding through grants, contracts or cooperative agreements for research involving vertebrate animals are required to comply with the PHS Policy.

NSF holds its awardees responsible for the humane care and treatment of any vertebrate animal used or intended for use in such activities as field or laboratory research, development, training, experiments, biological testing or for related purposes supported by NSF grants, contracts or cooperative agreements. Any NSF awardee performing research on vertebrate animals must comply with the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) [7 U.S.C. 2131 et seq.], the AWA regulations [9 CFR 1.1-4.11], the PHS Policy, and the U.S. Government Principles for the Utilization and Care of Vertebrate Animals Used in Testing, Research, and Training. The awardee must follow the guidelines described in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and the AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals.

Policy Memorandum: Expanding Public Access to Results of Federally Funded Research

February 22nd, 2013 by Mary Wood

Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) commends the Obama Administration for historic action

“Today, the Obama administration issued a historic Policy Memorandum that opens up access to the results of publicly funded research. ARL applauds the Obama administration for this critically important action. The memorandum calls upon federal agencies with annual research and development budgets of $100 million or more to provide the public with free and unlimited online access to the results of that research…”

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.Office of Science and Technology Policy ; blog post
..Commentary from Chronicle of Higher Education
.…….from Peter Suber ; from SPARC

Change in NSF Reporting Rules

January 10th, 2013 by Deanna Johnson

Data: Cooperation and Collaboration Efforts

December 21st, 2012 by Mary Wood

One particular slide from Furlough’s talk is especially noteworthy. 

Research Libraries and “Big Data” 

(made available from Penn State ScholarSphere, much like UC eScholarship

Mike Furlough
Penn State University Libraries
CENDI/NFAIS Workshop
December 11, 2012 Washington, DC 

 

DataONE, Data Conservancy and Data to Insight Center funded by NSF DataNet 

. 

MetaArchive dark preservation archive and GeoMAPP preservation of local/state government spatial data  funded by Library of Congress’ NDIIPP program 

. 

  

National Digital Stewardship Alliance, which includes members from academia, industry, and government, convened to work on Content Standards and Practices Infrastructure Innovation Outreach 

. 

DataCite develop mechanisms to assign persistent, unique identifiers to datasets so that they can be cited 

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Digital Preservation Network >75 universities contributed to fund an investigation of a national preservation network 

. 

 Chronopolis at SanDiego, HathiTrust, the Data Conservancy all have slightly different approaches to data storage and transfer 

DuraSpace.org, Digital Public Library of America DPLA, Committee on Institutional Cooperation CIC, Mercury, and Academic Preservation Trust 

On
this
screen
you
see
several
examples
of
the
kind
of
collaboration
I’m
talking
about.
DataOne,
Data
Concervancy
and
Data
to
Insight
Center
have
all
been
funded
by
NSF
through
DataNet.
MetaArchive,
a
dark
preservation
archive
making
use
of
peer-­‐to-­‐
peer
technology,
and
GeoMAPP,
focsed
on
the
preservation
of
local/state
government
spatial
data
were
both
funded
by
Library
of
Congress’s
NDIIPP
program.
There
are
new
ones
emerging
all
the
time.
The
Library
of
Congress’s
NDIIPP
program
has
given
rise
to
the
National
Digital
Stewardship
Alliance,
which
includes
members
from
academia,
industry,
and
government,
convened
to
work
on
Content
|
Standards
and
Practices
|
Infrastructure
|
Innovation
|
Outreach.
DataCite
is
an
organization
founded
by
several
European
national
libraries
and
including
some
North
American
libraries
to
work
with
the
publishing
industry
to
develop
the
mechanisms
to
assign
persistent,
unique
identifiers
to
datasets
so
that
they
can
be
cited.
The
Digital
Preservation
Network
is
the
newest
and
perhaps
the
most
ambitious.
Over
75
universities
have
contributed
at
least
$20k
to
fund
an
investigation
of
a
NATIONAL
preservation
network.
Two
strategies
of
DPN
worth
noting
are:
Preservation
in
enhanced
not
just
through
replication/storage,
but
by
replicating/storing
in
a
diversity
of
repository
infrastructures.
Chronopolis
at
San
Diego,
Hathi
Trust,
the
Data
Conservancy
all
have
slightly
different
approaches
to
data
storage
and
transfer.
Relying

Research Ethics Training – Graduate Students

August 28th, 2012 by Mary Wood

The Chronicle of Higher Education article:

How to Train Graduate Students in Research Ethics: Lessons from 6 Universities

discusses the new report from the Council of Graduate Schools,  “Research and Scholarly Integrity in Graduate Education: A Comprehensive Approach,” outlining the findings from the Project for Scholarly Integrity.  The six participating institutions were U Alabama Birmingham, U Arizona, Columbia, Emory, Michigan State, and Penn State.  The survey tools and the lessons learned are available at the Council on Graduate Schools.  Other universities are encouraged to consult the models to assess and improve their own ethics training.

Federal regulations require that all NSF grant recipients be trained in the “responsible and ethical conduct” of research; in 2009, the NSF said it would require only that institutions certify that they have provided ethics training.

Recipients of NIH funding must also comply with the requirement for Training in the Responsible Conduct of Research (2009 NOT-OD-10-019).  Congress established the Office of Research Integrity to promote integrity in biomedical and behavioral research supported by the U.S. Public Health Service.

.

Related resources and sites at UC Davis include:

.

Research Compliance and Integrity

Training

Research Ethics: RCR Program

.

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Dealing with Data

June 1st, 2012 by Mary Wood

PLoS Biology May 2012

.

Dealing with Data: A Case Study on Information and Data Management Literacy
Haendel MA, Vasilevsky NA, Wirz JA (2012)
PLoS Biol 10(5): e1001339. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001339
Article highlighted by the editors of PLoS Biology this week

..References include:

…..NIH Data Sharing Policy
…..Data.gov
…..Science Special Issue: Dealing with Data 2011, 331(6018):639-806

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CDL UC3 Manage your Data
…..Data management plans and DMPTool

.

.

Data Management Plans: Tips, Tricks and Tools

January 6th, 2012 by Mary Wood

Presenters: Carly Strasser and Perry Willett

Audience: Scientists, librarians, staff and researchers

Wednesday Jan 11 @ 2 pm
and

Thursday Jan 19 @ 10 am (same webinar presented)
.

Summary:   Although scientists learn about methods for collecting data, there is less emphasis on managing the resulting data effectively.
This is an increasingly important skill set, especially since funding agencies like NSF have begun to require data management plans.
In this webinar, we will cover best practices for scientific data management and review how to use the new DMPTool, a free online wizard from CDL for creating Data Management Plans.
There will be time allotted for discussion of data management and the DMPTool at the close of the webinar.

Preregistation required

Webinar will be recorded and available later.

Previous UC3 webinars available here.

Data Management for Scientists – DCXL @ UCD

November 1st, 2011 by Mary Wood

Excel : data storage, management, organization, and analysis

All UC Davis scientific researchers are invited to presentations to be held Thursday 11/3
by Dr. Carly Strasser, Project Manager for DCXL (Digital Curation for Excel), UC Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library

Both morning and afternoon presentation times are scheduled for a talk and optional hands-on session.
All sessions will be held at the same location in Shields Library.

Dr. Strasser is an expert on data, identifying potential problems, and streamlining workflow.   She is also knowledgeable about data management plans (now required for all NSF proposals), data archives available for your use, and best practices for data management.

.

Shields Library, Library Instruction Lab (LIL), Room 165
first floor, southeast corner

.
“Data management for scientists: how to reduce your workload, reuse your ideas, recycle your data”

It is rare that scientists are formally taught about good data management practices.  Instead we develop our own systems for filing documents, arranging data sheets, handling versions, and documenting analyses that are often unique and unintelligible to others.  In this talk, Dr. Strasser will focus on the common mistakes that scientists make, and how to avoid them. She will cover best practices for data management, which will facilitate data sharing, reuse, and archiving in the future.

10-11am and repeated at 3-4pm
Thursday, November 3, 2011

.

.
Hands-on Session: UCD scientists discussing/viewing their data/spreadsheets

Devoted time to ask questions about your data, show Dr. Strasser your spreadsheet(s), and get feedback from others about your organization strategy. Chat with her about your data sharing, reuse, and archiving practices, and how you use Excel. Share tips and tricks with other Davis scientists.  Attendees are invited to bring their own laptops or, if data is available via Web-accessible spreadsheets, 25 workstations for attendees are available with Internet access.

11am-noon and repeated at 4-5pm
Thursday, November 3, 2011

Data Management Planning Tool: UC3 Webinar

July 8th, 2011 by Mary Wood

The Data Management Planning Tool (DMP Tool):
….
a tool to help researchers meet funding agencies’ data management requirements

Come to the Carlson Health Sciences Library conference room – 2:00pm Thursday July 14 – for the next UC3 webinar.

NSF, Budget, Finance & Award Mgt (BFA)

Speakers:
Patricia Cruse, Director, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library

Abstract:
In January 2011 the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced that a data management plan must accompany all grant submissions. This major requirement by the NSF will undoubtedly be taken up by other funding agencies. In response to the NSF demand, a group of US libraries and research institutions have formed a partnership to build a Data Management Planning Tool (DMP Tool) to assist researchers in creating a data management plan. The UCLA Library, the UCSD libraries, and the UC Curation Center at the CDL are leading this initiative for the UC campuses.

The DMP Tool will be tailored to the requirements of US research funding agencies, as well as to the UC systemwide and campus policies. This tool will be freely available, allowing researchers across the UC to initiate a data management plan quickly and to provide answers to various data management questions relating to their research. The goal is move research data management forward at the national and international levels, ultimately facilitating information exchange at the data level. Join us to gain a better understanding of the DMP Tool, its uses, and availability.

Archive:

Webinar Slides | Webinar |

Data as Publication: UC3 Webinar

June 24th, 2011 by Mary Wood

Data as Publication

Come to the Carlson Health Sciences Library conference room – 2:00pm Thursday June 30 – for the next UC3 webinar.

Speakers:
John Kunze, Associate Director, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library
Catherine Mitchell, Director, Publishing Program, California Digital Library

Abstract:
There is an increasing need to establish a new publishing paradigm to cope with the deluge of data artifacts produced by data-intensive research, many of which are vital to data re-use and verification of published conclusions. Due to the limitations of traditional publishing, most of these artifacts are not usually disseminated, cited, or preserved. At the California Digital Library (CDL), one promising approach to the problem is to wrap these artifacts in the metaphor of a “data paper,” which is a somewhat unfamiliar bundle of scholarly output with a familiar facade: minimally, a set of links to archived artifacts and a cover sheet containing familiar elements such as title, authors, date, abstract, and persistent identifier, just enough to create basic citations, build “overlay journals,” and enable discovery of data by Internet search engines. Additional elements that permit deeper domain-specific discovery and re-use, such as variable names, methods, etc., are planned. A pilot implementation at CDL will bring a number of existing services to bear on the problem, including (a) the Merritt repository for safe, stable storage for datasets; (b) EZID for generating, managing, and resolving persistent identifiers; and (c) eScholarship for publishing data papers and overlay journals.

webinar  archive:
Slides | Webinar |

The UC3 Summer Webinar Series is a forum for timely topics of interest to the UC community. We will highlight projects, services, and developments in areas of digital preservation, web archiving and data curation. We hope to raise awareness of these issues, and the resources and services available to the UC community. Our webinars will feature librarians, scientists, and technologists.