Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

New NIH-EPA research centers to study environmental health disparities

June 7th, 2016 by Mary Wood

Centers of Excellence on Environmental Health Disparities Research

The National Institutes of Health has partnered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to fund five new research centers to improve health in communities overburdened by pollution and other environmental factors that contribute to health disparities. Within each center, scientists will partner with community organizations to study these concerns and develop culturally appropriate ways to reduce exposure to harmful environmental conditions.

The centers will examine a range of stressors on health, including air, water, and ground pollution as well as environmental conditions such as sub-standard housing, poor diet, and adverse social dynamics.

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The new centers

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Boston University School of Public Health, will study how housing conditions may affect birth weight, childhood growth trajectories, and risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and whether improved urban housing may benefit health.

Johns Hopkins University, will compare urban and rural effects of poverty on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of improved dietary intake on preventing or mitigating disease progression.

University of Arizona, will work with indigenous populations to examine chemical contamination of traditional foods, water, air, and household environments, and increase environmental health literacy.

University of New Mexico, will examine how contact with metal mixtures from abandoned mines affects rural Native American populations through exposures related to inadequate drinking water infrastructure, reliance on local foods, and other uses of local resources to maintain their traditional lifestyle and culture.

University of Southern California, will study how environmental factors may contribute to childhood obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy in Hispanic and Latino communities.

TRIP (Turning Research Into Practice) Database Premium Trial — through 12/30/2015

November 19th, 2015 by Amy Studer
TRIP Evidence-Based Pyramid

From TRIP Infographic: https://www.tripdatabase.com/info/

 

Have you tried TRIP? 

The TRIP Database is a publicly available (free) clinical search engine that is “designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.”

TRIP results are organized with easy-to-use evidence based practice filters (e.g., systematic reviews, evidence-based synopses, practice guidelines) to help clinicians quickly identify relevant evidence.  Practice guidelines are drawn from professional, governmental, and non-governmental organizations and are filtered by country, offering a global perspective on practice.

 

From now until December 30, 2015, Blaisdell Medical Library is offering a trial of TRIP Database Premium.

Test TRIP Database Premium version:  https://www.tripdatabase.com/

[Trial accessible from networked campus computers, with remote access via the University Library VPN]

A few benefits of a paid TRIP Database Premium subscription:

  • * 100,000 more systematic reviews
  • * linking to UC Davis University Library’s licensed electronic resources, such as full-text articles
  • * enabled ability to export to citation management software

We are interested in your comments!  What do you think about this resource?  bmlref@ucdavis.edu

One Health Graduate Seminar

March 3rd, 2015 by Mary Wood

Sessions : Monday and Wednesday 6:00pm‐8:00pm

Global health problems are complex and require culturally-sensitive, socially-acceptable, and action-oriented approaches to create practical and cost-effective solutions using a case-based format. This course will examine major health problems created by the convergence of human, animal, and environmental influences.

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REGISTRATION & CLASS DETAILS:

SPRING 2015:
Sessions for this one unit course take place every Monday and Wednesday 6:00pm‐8:00pm from March 30th to April 29th
One hundred percent attendance is required.

Participants can attend in Davis (Genome, Room 6202) or Sacramento (Education Building, Room 3228B). The class size for this course is limited; thus, a selection process is often implemented in order to maintain appropriate numbers and representation across disciplines.

2015 One Health Graduate Seminar Flyer

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World Malaria Day 2014

April 24th, 2014 by Mary Wood

WMD14-Logo-1AT-25Friday, April 25, 2014 Third annual Bay Area World Malaria Day Symposium  UC Berkeley
This symposium will convene the area’s top malaria researchers and experts for a day of innovation, knowledge-sharing and collaboration.  Symposium schedule

Speakers include:
Joseph DeRisi, Professor and Vice Chair of the Dept. Biochemistry & Biophysics, UCSF
Aydogan Ozcan, Professor, Electrical Engineering & Bioengineering Depts., UCLA
Elizabeth Ponder, Ctr Emerging & Neglected Diseases, UC Berkeley

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Participating UC Davis malaria researchers  include:
Gregory Lanzaro, Professor, SVM, PMI
Yoosook Lee, Assistant Researcher, SVM, PMI
Shirley Luckhart,  Professor, SOM, MMI
Laura Norris, National Institutes of Health T32 postdoctoral fellow
Bradley Main, National Institutes of Health T32 postdoctoral fellow

2014 West Virginia Elk River Chemical Release: Information Resources

February 3rd, 2014 by Amy Studer

Adapted from NLM Tech Bull. 2014 Jan-Feb;(396):b5.:

You may be aware from multiple news sources that little information was available about 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol at the time of the spill in West Virginia’s Elk River in early January 2014.

Since the spill, government and private sector scientists have contributed to collecting and verifying information about the chemical.

Here are some new resources about the chemical and the government response:

Please note that in some social media and early news reports, the chemical was MISIDENTIFIED as Methylcyclohexanol (CASRN: 25639-42-3). This is NOT the correct chemical.

In chemical incidents, it is unusual for little online information to be available about a substance. Chemicals can often be readily identified using online resources such as TOXNET and WISER. In the absence of published information, local and state officials request consultation with local, state, federal and industry experts. Typically, following such an incident there is immediate, ongoing, extensive consultation and communication among responders and experts to determine appropriate actions.

When planning for providing health information following chemical incidents, it is critical for institutions and government agencies to know who to contact in uncommon situations as well as knowing the authoritative published sources of chemical information.

Sources

Triclosan and antimicrobial soaps, continued

February 3rd, 2014 by Mary Wood

Environmental Factor
January 2014 Newsletter
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

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Research informs policy and regulatory discussion

Researchers central in the national discussion concerning policy and regulatory issues
related to environmental public health

December 2013 New York Times, FDA questions safety of antibacterial soaps, looked at new FDA requirement that manufacturers demonstrate the safety of antimicrobial soaps, citing research by NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) supported scientists…

…including SRP grantees Bruce Hammock and Isaac Pessah of UC Davis, and Robert Tukey of UCSD, who have conducted interdisciplinary studies on the extent of environmental pollution by the antimicrobials triclosan and tricloban, and their potential effects on human health.

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Citations:

Cherednichenko G, Zhang R, Bannister RA, Timofeyev V, Li N, Fritsch EB, Feng W, Barrientos GC, Schebb NH, Hammock BD, Beam KG, Chiamvimonvat N, Pessah IN.  2012. Triclosan impairs excitation-contraction coupling and Ca2+ dynamics in striated muscle. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109(35):14158-14163.

Schebb NH, Ahn KC, Dong H, Gee SJ, Hammock BD.  2012. Whole blood is the sample matrix of choice for monitoring systemic triclocarbon levels. Chemosphere 87(7):825-827.

Project Tycho: Data for health

December 5th, 2013 by Amy Studer

Announcing Project Tycho™, a web site which provides open access to newly digitized and integrated data from the entire 125 years history of United States weekly nationally notifiable disease surveillance data since 1888.  Read more about it:

The goal of Project Tycho™ is to aid scientists and public health officials in the eradication of deadly and devastating diseases. A recent NEJM article, documents how the Project Tycho team digitized and made public all weekly surveillance reports of nationally notifiable diseases for U.S. cities and states published between 1888 and 2011. The project derived a quantitative history of disease reduction in the United States over the past century, focusing particularly on the effect of vaccination programs.

Reference

van Panhuis WG, Grefenstette J, Jung SY, Chok NS, Cross A, Eng H, et al. Contagious diseases in the United States from 1888 to the present.N.Engl.J.Med. 2013 Nov 28;369(22):2152-2158.

Project Tycho Image

About Project Tycho

In the United States, cases of contagious diseases have been reported at weekly intervals to health authorities for more than a century, but these data have not been publicly available in a computable format, so their use and value have been limited. The University of Pittsburgh has released a collection of surveillance reports about diseases in the United States going back 125 years. “The researchers obtained all weekly notifiable disease surveillance tables published between 1888 and 2013 – approximately 6,500 tables – in various historical reports, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. These tables were available only in paper format or as PDF scans in online repositories that could not be read by computers and had to be hand-entered. With an estimated 200 million keystrokes, the data – including death counts, reporting locations, time periods and diseases – were digitized. A total of 56 diseases were reported for at least some period of time during the 125-year time span, with no single disease reported continuously.”

Blog entry re-posted from Rudolph Mata Library Blog by medref@tulane.edu, with permission.

UC Davis Global Health website

November 21st, 2013 by Mary Wood

“UC Davis is uniquely positioned to provide integrated solutions, education, and expertise on issues surrounding global health through a collaborative effort involving the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Veterinary Medicine, AgricultureEngineering, and Management and the program in Public Health and International Development.  Ours is a truly interdisciplinary approach to assessing and improving the health of people, animals, and the environment around the world.”

 

UC Davis Global Health website

Calendar of global health speakers, conferences, and events
Monthly Global Health Night first Tuesday of each month

Print

Wildfire smoke effects

October 25th, 2013 by Mary Wood

In light of yesterday’s release of the NRDC report, Wildfire Smoke Affects Communities Distant from Deadly Flames,

and the ongoing wildfires in Australia,

and as an addendum to the US Forest Service site Effects of Smoke Exposure on Firefighter Health,

linked here are PubMed citations to current research on the topic of wildland fire smoke and health:

wildland firefighters  ;  firefighter smoke exposure  ;  wildfire smoke adverse effects

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Whitewater-Baldy, Gila National Forest, NM
(AP Photo/U.S. Forest Service, Mark Pater)

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Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product, NOAA

Related UC research

UCD Air Quality Research Center
UC Davis experts: Wildfires
UC Cooperative Extension
UC Forest research and outreach: wildfire

 

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Previous blog posts
Fields and Forests in Flames
Wildland Fire Air Quality & Health
Wildland Fire Season

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Trial for PolicyMap until November 30, 2013

September 24th, 2013 by Bruce Abbott

The library is offering a trial to PolicyMap–a mapping and data tool until November 30, 2013. Please evaluate it and compare it to our existing subscription to Social Explorer.

Access it directly here: http://ucdavis.policymap.com

Here’s a bit of info on Policy Map:

PolicyMap is an online (no software installation needed) US national data and mapping tool and analytics platform with varied applications for college students and faculty. It is used in undergraduate and graduate curriculums and research related to social sciences, urban studies, real estate and housing analysis, community and economic development, public administration, public health, policy and political science, education, business, economics, statistics, and geography, among others. In the academic environment, PolicyMap enables students to concentrate on their subject matter rather than having to spend time learning a GIS tool. PolicyMap is web-based and geared toward users who may not be GIS experts but want to be able to analyze large amounts of data quickly and produce maps, tables, charts and reports with a minimal learning curve for the application itself.

Please send any comments to hslref@lib.ucdavis.edu