Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

Ebola Outbreak Resources

September 22nd, 2014 by Bruce Abbott

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) Disaster Information Management Research Center has created a web page,

Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources http://disasterinfo.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/ebola_2014.html

NLM has activated the Emergency Access Initiative in support of medical efforts in West Africa.

Emergency Access Initiative: http://eai.nlm.nih.gov
NLM Launches Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Healthcare Professionals Fighting Ebola Outbreak.

GIDEON coverage of Ebola: http://web.gideononline.com/web/epidemiology/index.php?disease=10700&country=G100&view=Distribution  GIDEON (Global Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology Online Network)  is used for diagnosis and reference in the fields of tropical and infectious diseases, epidemiology, microbiology and antimicrobial chemotherapy. Gideon is a licensed resource:  access through the VPN: https://vpn.lib.ucdavis.edu/web/epidemiology/index.php,DanaInfo=web.gideononline.com,SSO=U+?disease=10700&country=G100&view=Distribution

The Centers for Disease Control Ebola outbreak page:  http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/guinea/index.html.  In addition, the CDC has a general topic page on Ebola: http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/index.html

The World Health Organization has a web page on the outbreak: http://www.afro.who.int/en/clusters-a-programmes/dpc/epidemic-a-pandemic-alert-and-response/epr-highlights/4164-ebola-virus-disease-in-west-africa.html as well as a general topic page on Ebola http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/en/. This is the link to the WHO response page: http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/outbreak-response-plan/en/.

Update October 28, 2014:  Here is a resource guide from the University of Iowa:  http://guides.lib.uiowa.edu/ebola

 

Social Housing of Laboratory Animals: Symposium

September 8th, 2014 by Mary Wood

c7d7fa62-878d-4e29-b31d-a356816fcdecOctober 5-6, 2014
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Sponsored by CAAT, Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (NIH), APHIS and AWIC (USDA), and University of Colorado, Denver

This symposium, which is being held on the University of Colorado Anschultz Medical campus, will bring together experts in animal behavior and welfare to address common issues in trying to achieve the mandate for social housing for social species. The first day will focus on nonhuman primates and the second on ruminants, rabbits, rodents and pigs. Participants will be encouraged to discuss special issues they are facing at their institutions.

Full Details and Preliminary Agenda

1

NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing

September 7th, 2014 by Amy Studer

Image of Genomic Data Sharing Policy logo

On August 26, 2014, the National Institutes of Health has issued a final NIH Genomic Data Sharing (GDS) policy “to promote data sharing as a way to speed the translation of data into knowledge, products and procedures that improve health while protecting the privacy of research participants.”(NIH, August 27, 2014)

According to a post in The Chronicle of Higher Education, “The data-sharing policy, which will take effect with grants awarded in January, will give agency-financed researchers six months to load any genomic data they collect—from human or nonhuman subjects—into a government-established database or a recognized alternative.” (Basken, August 28, 2014)

References and Additional Information:

Basken, P. (August 28, 2014).  NIH Tells Genomic Researchers: ‘You Must Share Data.’  The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Accessed September 7, 2014, from http://chronicle.com/article/NIH-Tells-Genomic-Researchers-/148509/

National Institutes of Health Genomic Data Sharing Governance Committee. (2014). Data use under the NIH GWAS Data Sharing Policy and future directions. Nature Genetics, 46(9), 934-938. doi: 10.1038/ng.3062.  Retrieved September 7, 2014, from http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v46/n9/full/ng.3062.html

U.S. National Institutes of Health. (2014).  Genomic data sharing.  Accessed September 7, 2014, from http://gds.nih.gov/index.html

U.S. National Institutes of Health.  (August 27, 2014).  NIH Genomic Data Sharing Policy (NOT-OD-14-124).  Accessed September 7, 2014, from http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-14-124.html

U.S. National Institutes of Health. (August 27, 2014). NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing.  NIH News & Events Blog.  Accessed September 7, 2014, from http://www.nih.gov/news/health/aug2014/od-27.htm

 

NCBI Workshops at UC Davis

August 9th, 2014 by Amy Studer

NCBI 2014 cropped

September 15 – 16, 2014

Presented by Peter Cooper, PhD & Wayne Matten, PhD
National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)

2205 Haring Hall

Pre-registration is complete. 

You are welcome to register on-site, 15 minutes prior to the start of each workshop.

This series of in-person workshops will focus on the following:

Monday, September 15, 2014:

9-11:30am             Navigating NCBI Molecular Data Using the Integrated Entrez System and BLAST

1-3:30pm               NCBI Genomes, Assemblies and Annotation Products: Microbes to Human

Tuesday, September 16, 2014:

9am-11:30am       Advanced NCBI BLAST

1-3:30pm               Gene Expression Resources at NCBI

Workshop format will include lecture and hands-on activities.  Participants are encouraged to bring laptops for practice sessions.  Workshops are free of charge and open to UC Davis faculty, students and staff, as well as others in the Sacramento region.  Guest wireless Internet access will be provided.

Printed handouts will NOT be provided.  Link to course materials:  http://1.usa.gov/1xgMv22

Questions?       Contact hsadmin@lib.ucdavis.edu

 

UC Davis Library Logo

 

For a detailed description of workshops:  Read the rest of this entry »

US Department of Energy Launches PAGES

August 5th, 2014 by Amy Studer

Image credit:  Sergey Sus.  License:  CC BY-NC-SA 2.0. <br/> https://flic.kr/p/96iTMv

On August 4, 2014, the US Department of Energy (DOE) unveiled its plan to increase access to the research that it funds, as required by the White House OSTP directive of February 22, 2013.

Now available is a beta version of the Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (PAGES). The DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information website provides links to the full plan, FAQs, as well as this short summary:

” In response to the OSTP directive, OSTI has developed and launched the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and ScienceBeta – DOE PAGESBeta. When fully operational, this new resource will offer free access to the best available full-text version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications – either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published article – after an administrative interval of 12 months. ”

According to Nature News Blog (August 4, 2014), the PAGES approach will make up to 30,000 papers per year “free to read”, but open access advocates are concerned that the approach may not provide for bulk downloading, re-distribution or creative re-use, such as text-mining.

More description of the PAGES approach from the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information website:

” The portal that OSTI has prepared employs a hybrid model of centralized metadata and primarily decentralized full-text access to accepted manuscripts or articles hosted by DOE-funded national laboratories, universities, and other institutions or by individual publishers. In this way, the gateway builds on DOE’s existing scientific and technical information infrastructure and also integrates publishers’ public access efforts. For publisher-hosted content, OSTI has been collaborating with the publisher consortium CHORUS, or the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States. OSTI is also engaging with other stakeholders’ initiatives to advance public access, such as the university and research library community’s Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE). ”

For more information:

ScienceInsider Blog

The Chronicle of Higher Education

Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE)

Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS)

Image credit: Sergey Sus. License: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.  https://flic.kr/p/96iTMv

IOM Report released: Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation’s Health Needs

July 29th, 2014 by Bruce Abbott

cover

 

 

The Institute of Medicine has issued its long awaited report on Graduate Medical Education and it calls for major changes to the mechanisms for funding for residency positions.

Report at a Glance

  • Figure- Estimated sources of $15 billion in public funding for GME (HTML)
  • Recommendations (PDF, HTML)
  • Report Brief (PDF, HTML)

Open Access Fund subsidizes author publishing fees

July 9th, 2014 by Mary Wood

UC Davis University Library continues to fund the UC Davis Open Access Fund

ucdoafundcropped

In support of UCD authors publishing in fully open access journals, awards of up to $1000 are available to offset the author publishing fees.

Application information may be found here : UC Open Access Fund libguide

Scopus User Survey: Tell Us What You Think

July 2nd, 2014 by Raquel Abad

You may already know that all ten UC campuses have access to Elsevier’s Scopus database for the 2014 calendar year. UC is providing an initial subscription; however, to continue the subscription, the UC Libraries need to hear from the community about whether Scopus is important to UC research, and whether it is a useful and necessary research and teaching tool. The UC Libraries have created a very short (i.e., five minute) UC Scopus User survey. It can also be found in the top right corner of every Scopus web page.

Scopus is a citation and abstracting database that covers a broad universe of peer reviewed journal and conference literature, with links to Fulltext – when available – through the library. Covering scientific, technical, medical, social science, and arts and humanities disciplines, Scopus indexes nearly 21,000 journals and more than 340 book series from more than 5,000 international publishers.

Scopus allows researchers to perform citation searches to see how many times a work has been cited, by whom, and to rank searches by times cited, from 1996 to the present. It also offers tools to track, analyze, and visualize research, as well as a capability to cross-search more than 25 million patents.

LAMHDI : Link Animal Models to Human DIsease

June 20th, 2014 by Mary Wood

logo

As reviewed in Lab Animal  43, 236 (2014)
19 June 2014 | doi:10.1038/laban.564i

LAMHDI : Link Animal Models to Human DIsease
is designed to accelerate the research process by providing biomedical researchers with a simple, comprehensive web-based resource to find the best animal models for their research. A stated goal is “to allow researchers to share information about and access to animal models so they can refine research and testing, and reduce or replace the use of animal models where possible.”

The site is provided by NIH National Center for Research Resources.

LAMHDI Database Search is a search of data from partners, currently including MGI, Mouse Genome Informatics;  ZFIN, Zebrafish Model Organism Database; RGD, Rat Genome Database; SGD, Saccharomyces Genome Database; and FlyBase, Database of Drosophila Genes & Genomes. Additional options include a web-search and an extensive list of Featured Resources.

Translational Medicine: Bench to Bedside

June 10th, 2014 by Mary Wood
Science Reference for Library of Congress announces availability of a new science webcast
.
 
The Library of Congress celebrated the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the DNA structure with a panel discussion that included
Nobel Laureate James D. Watson  (in collaboration with other scientists discovered the structure of DNA)
Nobel Laureate Carol Greider, Johns Hopkins Univ (and graduate of Davis Senior High, UCSB, and UCB)
Orla Smith, moderator, managing editor of Science Translational Medicine
.
The discussion focused on translational medicine, which takes basic scientific discoveries in the laboratory (bench) and uses it in the field (bedside) to produce new drugs, devices and treatment options of cancer and other diseases. The biological processes brought about by understanding the structure of DNA have been opening doors to new medical research and treatments since 1953.
.
library-of-congress-logo
Video also on the Library’s YouTube channel