Department Blog

Health Sciences Libraries

Samples from Pembroke Welsh Corgis for ALS Research Needed

January 10th, 2017 by Deanna Johnson

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a devastating disorder of older adults that is characterized by progressive loss of muscle function. Ultimately victims of this disease become completely paralyzed and eventually die when the muscles that control breathing and swallowing no longer work.

An analogous disease called degenerative myelopathy (DM) occurs in older dogs from a number of breeds, but is particularly common in Pembroke Welsh Corgis. The disease in Corgis usually has an onset at about 8 years of age with progressive loss of hind limb function early in the disease. In the early stages affected dogs can still manage to have a reasonable quality of life if they are provided with a “wheelchair” type device such as that shown in the picture above. Unfortunately, as with ALS patients, muscles in addition to those of the hind limbs eventually become involved and the dogs eventually will become completely paralyzed if allowed to live long enough. Many affected dogs are euthanized before they reach this stage of the disease.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi with DM

The Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Laboratory (NDRL) at the MU School of Medicine in Columbia, Missouri is conducting research to examine the changes that occur in the muscles and in the nerves that control them in Corgis. By examining these tissues from dogs euthanized at different stages of the disease, as well as from unaffected age-matched Corgis, they hope to develop a picture of how the disease develops and thereby develop a rational approach to therapy that they hope will apply to both DM and ALS. In order for these studies to succeed, researchers at the NDRL need nerve and muscle tissue donations from both affected and particularly unaffected Corgis that are being euthanized. The NDRL will provide kits to veterinarians to preserve and ship the tissues to NDRL for analyses. If you have or know of an older Pembroke Welsh Corgi that is being euthanized for any reason and would like to assist with this important research by donating tissues from the dog, please contact either Professor Martin Katz (katzm@health.missouri.edu) or Dr. Joan Coates (coatesj@missouri.edu) to arrange to have a kit for the tissue preservation and shipping sent.

NEW! The AVMA Animal Health Studies Database

July 1st, 2016 by Deanna Johnson

The AVMA launched the AVMA Animal Health Studies Database in June as a resource for researchers seeking animals to participate in clinical studies and for veterinarians and animal owners exploring options for treatment. It will encompass all fields of veterinary medicine, all species of animals, and will extend beyond the United States to Canada and the United Kingdom. Ahead of the launch, the Veterinary Cancer Society transferred all the studies from its Veterinary Cancer Trials website—about 100—into the AVMA database; and the AVMA has been soliciting studies from veterinary colleges. So far, 153 studies are represented.

The AVMA Aniaml Health Studies Database is at http://www.avma.org/FindVetStudies, and additional information can be read at https://www.avma.org/news/javmanews/pages/160715a.aspx?utm_source=javma-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=gen in JAVMA News.

Elsevier Webinar on 3/7/16: Pure & ORCID Working Together

March 2nd, 2016 by Deanna Johnson

ORCID is an international leader in connecting researchers to their research and Pure is a best-in-class research information system that helps universities maintain trusted records about researcher activity on campus. Elsevier is proud to announce that now the curated data from Pure can now be synced to ORCID, increasing the number of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) tied to ORCIDs.

To celebrate the connection, Pure and ORCID are co-hosting a joint webinar along with Professor Thomas Ryberg, a specialist in networked learning, knowledge sharing and digital practices at Aalborg University.

What will be discussed:

A researcher’s point of view on ORCID, Pure and linking researchers to research
How pushing more DOIs into ORCID can benefit the research ecosystem
An overview of how Pure shares information with ORCID

Speakers

Thomas Ryberg,
Professor, Aalborg University

Josh Brown,
Regional Director, Europe, ORCID

Manya Buchan,
Pure Product Manager, Elsevier

Time
Monday March 7, 2016
7:00 San Francisco
10:00 New York/Boston

Register Here

NIH : BRAIN Initiative

June 6th, 2014 by Mary Wood

Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN)

NIH news release 6.5.14: New report outlines initiative goals, budget, and timeline

A federal report BRAIN 2025 : A Scientific Vision calls for $4.5 billion in funding for brain research over the next 12 years.  The long-term scientific vision of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative was presented by the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD).

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For more information about the BRAIN Initiative and the ACD working group:
NIH BRAIN Initiative website
NIH BRAIN Initiative Feedback website
NIH Advisory Committee to the Director BRAIN Working Group website

Reproducibility in Research with Animal Models

May 21st, 2014 by Mary Wood

The first workshop organized by the National Academies ILAR, Roundtable on Science and Welfare in Laboratory Animal Use will be held June 4-5, 2014 in Washington DC, and will discuss reproducibility issues in research with animals and animal models.

Reproducibility Issues in Research with Animals and Animal Models: A Workshop

June 4-5, 2014
Register here to join in person or by webcast

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Workshop Agenda
Restoring Faith in the Research Enterprise: A Call to Action
Malcolm Macleod, Univ of Edinburgh ;  Henry Bourne, Univ of California San Francisco

Citizens and Science: How Reproducibility Directly Impacts Public Perceptions
Robert Bazell, Yale Univ ; Jan Piotrowski, The Economist

Great Expectations – Critical Assessment of Published Research
C. Glenn Begley, TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals

Heard but Not Learned? Impact and Outcomes of Previous ILAR Efforts
Jeffrey Everitt, GlaxoSmithKline ;  Coenraad F. M. Hendriksen, Netherlands Vaccine Institute

All Hands on Deck – Actions Taken to Date
Gilly Griffin, Canadian Council for Animal Care ; Jonathan Kimmelman, McGill Univ

Russell and Burch Revisited: Reconciling “Reproducibility” with “Replacement, Reduction, and Refinement”
Michael Festing, Independent Consultant ; Stephen Latham, Yale Univ

Can Research Integrity be Incentivized?
Brian Martinson, HealthPartners Institute for Education & Research ; Elizabeth Marincola, PLoS

Reproducibility Challenges in the Future of Animal Models
Roger Reeves, Johns Hopkins Univ ; Jeffrey Rogers, Baylor College of Medicine ; Monte Westerfield, Univ of Oregon

Improving the Reliability of Published Results
Gaylen Edwards, American Physiological Society ; Elizabeth Marincola, PLoS ; Victoria Stodden, Columbia Univ

IOs, Vets, and IACUCs – Making Internal Regulators Partners in Reform
Kathryn Bayne, AAALAC International ; Stuart Zola, Emory Univ ; Jerry Collins, Yale Univ

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Billion of Cure: Proactive Planning in the Preclinical Research Arena
John P. A. Ioannidis, Stanford Prevention Research Center ; Paul Braunschweiger, CITI Program ; Ghislaine Poirier, GlaxoSmithKline

Summing Up: Lessons Learned, Major Themes and Potential Actions for Moving Forward
Kent Lloyd, Univ of California, Davis

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The second workshop, to be held September 3-4, 2014, will examine issues relating to transportation of laboratory animals.

Related blog post:  National Academies Launches New Roundtable on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare

NIH and California: by the numbers

April 28th, 2014 by Mary Wood

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FASEB Releases Updated NIH State Factsheets

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FASEB has created a new set of factsheets describing the importance of NIH funding to each state. The factsheets include a table listing NIH funding by congressional district, a summary of the biomedical research profile for the state, and talking points on how investment in NIH research benefits the economy of the state.

NIH State Information Factsheets

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California State Factsheet (pdf)

 

 

Genetic, health info added to NIH dbGaP

February 27th, 2014 by Mary Wood
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dbGaP – Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes

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Genetic Epidemiology Research on Aging (GERA)

NIH News

UCSF News

Researchers will now have access to genetic data linked to medical information on a diverse group of more than 78,000 people, enabling investigations into many diseases and conditions. The data, from one of the nation’s largest and most diverse genomics projects — Genetic Epidemiology Research on Aging (GERA) — have just been made available to qualified researchers through the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), an online genetics database of the National Institutes of Health.

The GERA cohort was developed collaboratively by Kaiser Permanente and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). The addition of the data to dbGaP was made possible with support from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute of Mental Health, and NIH.

dbGaP was developed and is managed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, a division of the National Library of Medicine. Investigators who are interested in applying for access to this database should follow the procedures on the dbGaP website. Specific information on the data can be found here.

Research: increasing value, reducing waste

January 29th, 2014 by Mary Wood

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Clinical Series
January 8, 2014

Executive summary

The Lancet presents a Series of five papers about research… These papers set out some of the most pressing issues, recommend how to increase value and reduce waste in biomedical research, and propose metrics for stakeholders to monitor the implementation of these recommendations.
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Papers

Clinical Series
The Lancet commissions Series and themed issues to highlight clinically important topics and areas of health and medicine that are pertinent to physicians’ practice. They are groups of two or three articles which provide an in depth view of individual clinical areas, and are an ideal source of up-to-date knowledge.

NIH plans to enhance reproducibility

January 27th, 2014 by Mary Wood
27 January 2014

“Francis S. Collins and Lawrence A. Tabak discuss initiatives that the US National Institutes of Health is exploring to restore the self-correcting nature of preclinical research.”
Nature 505, 612–613 (30 January 2014) doi:10.1038/505612a

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Reproducibility-logo.

Nature | Special

Challenges in irreproducible research

“…Nature has published a series of articles about the worrying extent to which research results have been found wanting…  Journals, research laboratories and institutions and funders all have an interest in tackling issues of irreproducibility. We hope that the articles contained in this collection will help.”

Diseases of Research Animals : DORA

June 13th, 2013 by Mary Wood

The Diseases of Research Animals (DORA)

… is a tool primarily designed to benefit veterinarians, veterinary students and residents involved in the care of animal species commonly used in research…  This site includes relevant information, such as incidence, transmission, clinical signs, pathology and diagnosis.  Figures illustrating clinical presentation and pathology are provided whenever possible to augment descriptions…  it is meant to serve as a basic, solid and readily accessible reference, highlighting some of the most important aspects of the most common diseases of research animals.

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developed by University of Missouri, Comparative Medicine Program