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Elsevier Webinar on 3/7/16: Pure & ORCID Working Together

March 2nd, 2016 by Deanna Johnson

ORCID is an international leader in connecting researchers to their research and Pure is a best-in-class research information system that helps universities maintain trusted records about researcher activity on campus. Elsevier is proud to announce that now the curated data from Pure can now be synced to ORCID, increasing the number of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) tied to ORCIDs.

To celebrate the connection, Pure and ORCID are co-hosting a joint webinar along with Professor Thomas Ryberg, a specialist in networked learning, knowledge sharing and digital practices at Aalborg University.

What will be discussed:

A researcher’s point of view on ORCID, Pure and linking researchers to research
How pushing more DOIs into ORCID can benefit the research ecosystem
An overview of how Pure shares information with ORCID

Speakers

Thomas Ryberg,
Professor, Aalborg University

Josh Brown,
Regional Director, Europe, ORCID

Manya Buchan,
Pure Product Manager, Elsevier

Time
Monday March 7, 2016
7:00 San Francisco
10:00 New York/Boston

Register Here

Triclosan impairs excitation-contraction coupling…

August 17th, 2012 by Mary Wood

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Chemical widely used in antibacterial hand soaps may impair muscle function

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Triclosan impairs excitation-contraction coupling and Ca2+ dynamics in striated muscle

Cherednichenko G, Zhang R, Bannister RA, Timofeyev V, Li N, Fritsch EB, Feng W, Barrientos GC, Schebb NH, Hammock BD, Beam KG, Chiamvimonvat N, Pessah IN.

Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and Department of Entomology and Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Aug 13. [Epub ahead of print]

Triclosan (TCS), a high-production-volume chemical used as a bactericide in personal care products, is a priority pollutant of growing concern to human and environmental health. TCS is capable of altering the activity of type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), but its potential to influence physiological excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) and muscle function has not been investigated. Here, we report that TCS impairs ECC of both cardiac and skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo. TCS acutely depresses hemodynamics and grip strength in mice at doses ≥12.5 mg/kg i.p., and a concentration ≥0.52 μM in water compromises swimming performance in larval fathead minnow. In isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes, skeletal myotubes, and adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers TCS depresses electrically evoked ECC within ∼10-20 min. In myotubes, nanomolar to low micromolar TCS initially potentiates electrically evoked Ca(2+) transients followed by complete failure of ECC, independent of Ca(2+) store depletion or block of RyR1 channels. TCS also completely blocks excitation-coupled Ca(2+) entry. Voltage clamp experiments showed that TCS partially inhibits L-type Ca(2+) currents of cardiac and skeletal muscle, and [(3)H]PN200 binding to skeletal membranes is noncompetitively inhibited by TCS in the same concentration range that enhances [(3)H]ryanodine binding. TCS potently impairs orthograde and retrograde signaling between L-type Ca(2+) and RyR channels in skeletal muscle, and L-type Ca(2+) entry in cardiac muscle, revealing a mechanism by which TCS weakens cardiac and skeletal muscle contractility in a manner that may negatively impact muscle health, especially in susceptible populations. PMID: 22891308 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Lung Research

April 14th, 2011 by Mary Wood

Lung Research Day Symposium

April 13, 2011,  Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility, UC Davis
UCDavis Health System, Clinical and Translational Science Center, with School of Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, and College of Engineering

Following are citations and links to a few of the most recent articles written by some of the speakers at yesterday’s symposium

1: Kim KH, Bose DD, Ghogha A, Riehl J, Zhang R, Barnhart CD, Lein PJ, Pessah IN.  Para- and Ortho-Substitutions Are Key Determinants of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Activity toward Ryanodine Receptors and Neurotoxicity. Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Apr;119(4):519-26.  PubMed PMID: 21106467.

2: Zeki AA, Kenyon NJ, Yoneda K, Louie S. The Adult Asthmatic. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2011 Mar 22.  PubMed PMID: 21424682.

3: Filosto S, Castillo S, Danielson A, Franzi L, Khan E, Kenyon N, Last J, Pinkerton K, Tuder R, Goldkorn T. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2: a novel target in cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis and lung injury. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2011 Mar;44(3):350-60.  PubMed PMID: 20448054.

4: Rohlman DS, Anger WK, Lein PJ. Correlating neurobehavioral performance with biomarkers of organophosphorous pesticide exposure. Neurotoxicology. 2011 Mar;32(2):268-76. PubMed Central PMCID:  PMC3057226.

5: Textor JA, Norris JW, Tablin F. Effects of preparation method, shear force, and exposure to collagen on release of growth factors from equine platelet-rich plasma. Am J Vet Res. 2011 Feb;72(2):271-8. PubMed PMID: 21281204.

6: Farahat FM, Ellison CA, Bonner MR, McGarrigle BP, Crane AL, Fenske RA, Lasarev MR, Rohlman DS, Anger WK, Lein PJ, Olson JR. Biomarkers of Chlorpyrifos Exposure  and Effect in Egyptian Cotton Field Workers. Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Jan 11.  PubMed PMID: 21224175.

7: Crofton KM, Mundy WR, Lein PJ, Bal-Price A, Coecke S, Seiler AE, Knaut H, Buzanska L, Goldberg A. Developmental neurotoxicity testing: recommendations for  developing alternative methods for the screening and prioritization of chemicals. ALTEX. 2011;28(1):9-15. PubMed PMID: 21311847.

8: Zeki AA, Kenyon NJ, Goldkorn T. Statin drugs, metabolic pathways, and asthma:  a therapeutic opportunity needing further research. Drug Metab Lett. 2011 Jan;5(1):40-4. PubMed PMID: 21198438.

9: Abdu E, Bruun DA, Yang D, Yang J, Inceoglu B, Hammock BD, Alkayed NJ, Lein PJ. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids enhance axonal growth in primary sensory and cortical neuronal cell cultures. J Neurochem. 2010 Dec 14.  PubMed PMID: 21155804.

10: Guillaumin J, Jandrey KE, Norris JW, Tablin F. Analysis of a commercial dimethyl-sulfoxide-stabilized frozen canine platelet concentrate by turbidimetric aggregometry. J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio). 2010 Dec;20(6):571-7.   PubMed PMID: 21166978.

11: Zeki AA, Bratt JM, Rabowsky M, Last JA, Kenyon NJ. Simvastatin inhibits goblet cell hyperplasia and lung arginase in a mouse model of allergic asthma: a  novel treatment for airway remodeling? Transl Res. 2010 Dec;156(6):335-49.  PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2990975.

12: Lee YC, Oslund KL, Thai P, Velichko S, Fujisawa T, Duong T, Denison MS, Wu R. TCDD Induced MUC5AC Expression: Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Independent/EGFR/ERK/p38-Dependent SP1-Based Transcription. Am J Respir  Cell Mol Biol. 2010 Oct 22.  PubMed PMID: 20971882.

13: Fujisawa T, Chang MM, Velichko S, Thai P, Hung LY, Huang F, Phuong N, Chen Y, Wu R. NF-{kappa}B Mediates IL-1ss- and IL-17A-induced MUC5B Expression in the Airway Epithelial Cells.  Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2010 Oct 8.PubMed PMID: 20935193.

14: Lee D, Wallis C, Wexler AS, Schelegle ES, Van Winkle LS, Plopper CG, Fanucchi MV, Kumfer B, Kennedy IM, Chan JK. Small particles disrupt postnatal airway development. J Appl Physiol. 2010 Oct;109(4):1115-24.  PubMed PMID: 20634362.

15: den Hartigh LJ, Lamé MW, Ham W, Kleeman MJ, Tablin F, Wilson DW. Endotoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient fine particulate matter from Fresno, California initiate human monocyte inflammatory responses mediated by reactive oxygen species. Toxicol In Vitro. 2010 Oct;24(7):1993-2002.  PubMed PMID: 20801209.

16: Goldkorn T, Filosto S. Lung injury and cancer: Mechanistic insights into ceramide and EGFR signaling under cigarette smoke. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2010 Sep;43(3):259-68.  Review.  PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2933544.

17: Owens SD, Johns JL, Walker NJ, Librach FA, Carrade DD, Tablin F, Borjesson DL. Use of an in vitro biotinylation technique for determination of posttransfusion survival of fresh and stored autologous red blood cells in Thoroughbreds. Am J Vet Res. 2010 Aug;71(8):960-6. PubMed PMID: 20673097.

18: Albertine KH, Dahl MJ, Gonzales LW, Wang ZM, Metcalfe D, Hyde DM, Plopper CG, Starcher BC, Carlton DP, Bland RD.  Chronic lung disease in preterm lambs: effect  of daily vitamin A treatment on alveolarization. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2010 Jul;299(1):L59-72. Epub 2010 Apr 9. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2904099.

19: Van Winkle LS, Baker GL, Chan JK, Schelegle ES, Plopper CG. Airway mast cells in a rhesus model of childhood allergic airways disease. Toxicol Sci. 2010 Jul;116(1):313-22. Epub 2010 Apr 19. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2886865.

20: Oslund KL, Adamson G, Wu R. Evaluation of MUC5AC expression and upregulation  in airway epithelial cells of horses. Am J Vet Res. 2010 Jun;71(6):690-6. PubMed  PMID: 20513186.

21: Evans MJ, Fanucchi MV, Plopper CG, Hyde DM. Postnatal development of the lamina reticularis in primate airways. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2010 Jun;293(6):947-54. Review. PubMed PMID: 20503389.

22: Rutledge JC, Ng KF, Aung HH, Wilson DW. Role of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in diabetic nephropathy. Nat Rev Nephrol. 2010 Jun;6(6):361-70. Epub 2010 May 4. Review. PubMed PMID: 20440276.

23: Farahat FM, Fenske RA, Olson JR, Galvin K, Bonner MR, Rohlman DS, Farahat TM, Lein PJ, Anger WK. Chlorpyrifos exposures in Egyptian cotton field workers. Neurotoxicology. 2010 Jun;31(3):297-304. Epub 2010 Mar 1. PubMed PMID: 20193710.

24: Proskocil BJ, Bruun DA, Thompson CM, Fryer AD, Lein PJ. Organophosphorus pesticides decrease M2 muscarinic receptor function in guinea pig airway nerves via indirect mechanisms. PLoS One. 2010 May 10;5(5):e10562. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2866713.

25: Zeki AA, Schivo M, Chan AL, Hardin KA, Kenyon NJ, Albertson TE, Rosenquist GL, Louie S. Geoepidemiology of COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. J Autoimmun. 2010 May;34(3):J327-38. Epub 2009 Dec 16. Review. PubMed PMID: 20018478.

26: Hsia CC, Hyde DM, Ochs M, Weibel ER. How to measure lung structure–what for? On the “Standards for the quantitative assessment of lung structure”. Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2010 Apr 30;171(2):72-4.  PubMed PMID: 20206304.

27: Filosto S, Fry W, Knowlton AA, Goldkorn T. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) is a phosphoprotein regulated by calcineurin (PP2B). J Biol Chem. 2010  Apr 2;285(14):10213-22. Epub 2010 Jan 27. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2856226.

28: Evans MJ, Fanucchi MV, Miller LA, Carlson MA, Nishio SJ, Hyde DM. Reduction of collagen VII anchoring fibrils in the airway basement membrane zone of infant  rhesus monkeys exposed to house dust mite. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2010 Apr;298(4):L543-7. Epub 2010 Feb 5. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2853345.

29: Albertine KH, Dahl MJ, Gonzales LW, Wang ZM, Metcalfe D, Hyde DM, Plopper CG, Starcher BC, Carlton DP, Bland RD. Chronic lung disease in preterm lambs: effect  of daily vitamin A treatment on alveolarization. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2010 Jul;299(1):L59-72. Epub 2010 Apr 9. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2904099.

30: Hsia CC, Hyde DM, Ochs M, Weibel ER. ATS/ERS Joint Task Force on Quantitative Assessment of Lung Structure. An official research policy statement of the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society: standards for quantitative assessment of lung structure. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Feb 15;181(4):394-418. PubMed PMID: 20130146.

31: Evans MJ, Fanucchi MV, Miller LA, Carlson MA, Nishio SJ, Hyde DM. Reduction of collagen VII anchoring fibrils in the airway basement membrane zone of infant  rhesus monkeys exposed to house dust mite. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2010 Apr;298(4):L543-7. Epub 2010 Feb 5. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2853345.

32: Lee YC, Oslund KL, Thai P, Velichko S, Fujisawa T, Duong T, Denison MS, Wu R. TCDD Induced MUC5AC Expression: Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Independent/EGFR/ERK/p38-Dependent SP1-Based Transcription. Am J Respir  Cell Mol Biol. 2010 Oct 22. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 20971882.

33: Fujisawa T, Chang MM, Velichko S, Thai P, Hung LY, Huang F, Phuong N, Chen Y, Wu R. NF-{kappa}B Mediates IL-1ss- and IL-17A-induced MUC5B Expression in the Airway Epithelial Cells. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2010 Oct 8. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 20935193.

34: Oslund KL, Adamson G, Wu R. Evaluation of MUC5AC expression and upregulation  in airway epithelial cells of horses. Am J Vet Res. 2010 Jun;71(6):690-6. PubMed  PMID: 20513186.

35: Chen Y, Wu R, Felton J, Rocke DM, Chakicherla A.  A Method to Detect Differential Gene expression in Cross-Species Hybridization Experiments at Gene and Probe Level. Biomed Inform Insights. 2010 Mar 5;2010(3):1-10. PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2928260.

Affiliation Search in Scopus – UCD Health System

September 7th, 2010 by Mary Wood

The following is a list of the 20 most recent publications from the UC Davis Health System faculty as found through SCOPUS, a large abstract and citation database of research literature and quality web sources. This list is generated through a SCOPUS affiliation search query.

SCOPUS also offers journal analytics and author citation analytics.logo_Scopus

For information about constructing a custom listing generated by SCOPUS, please contact us:
hslref@ucdavis.edu or mclref@ucdavis.edu

Teach-it-forward!

August 21st, 2009 by

 

This year I got the chance to be involved again in the “Summer Scrubs & Beyond”, a three-day intensive program for fifty high schoolers from three schools in Sacramento (last year there were thirty or so), with a general focus on neuroscience throughout the classes and lectures. My class, an hour each day, was “reading and writing”. I tried to make the instruction as general as possible so the students could take the principles with them to apply to some other subjects.

Standard MRI

Standard MRI

 

To help accomplish this I gave them, the first day, a research article about MRI scanning of the brain during direct perception of musical chords in different modes and how that correlated to emotional response. We went through the article on day two to see how it demonstrated medical research and writing principles.

 

My general goals were to teach them

·      the broad scope and flow of medical research.

·      how research ends up in journal articles.

·      how to read a journal article.

·      looking up unknown words in dictionaries and online

·      some principles of medical jargon—Greek and Latin roots and combining forms.

·      how articles are abstracted.

 

At the end of the second session, I gave them a second article in the same general subject, from which the abstract had been removed. Their assignment was to write an abstract.

 

I gave them some guidelines: an abstract should be about 5% of the length of the article, and it should tell the reader.

·      What they were trying to discover;

·      Why the study needed to be done:

·      How did they go about it, and

·      What did they learn in the end.

 

The third day we went over the second article, reinforced some of the points we learned in the previous days, and talked about the abstract.

 

The response of the students was remarkably encouraging. There were very few blank stares during class, lots of questions, several students willing (or even eager) to participate; and fair number of the students did the assignment and wrote an abstract for the article.

 

The Articles:

 

I. Khalfa, S., D. Schon, et al. (2005). “Brain regions involved in the recognition of happiness and sadness in music.” Neuroreport 16(18): 1981-4.

Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test for the lateralization of the brain regions specifically involved in the recognition of negatively and positively valenced musical emotions. The manipulation of two major musical features (mode and tempo), resulting in the variation of emotional perception along the happiness-sadness axis, was shown to principally involve subcortical and neocortical brain structures, which are known to intervene in emotion processing in other modalities. In particular, the minor mode (sad excerpts) involved the left orbito and mid-dorsolateral frontal cortex, which does not confirm the valence lateralization model. We also show that the recognition of emotions elicited by variations of the two perceptual determinants rely on both common (BA 9) and distinct neural mechanisms.

 

II. Pallesen, K. J., E. Brattico, et al. (2005). “Emotion processing of major, minor, and dissonant chords: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.” Ann N Y Acad Sci 1060: 450-3.

Musicians and nonmusicians listened to major, minor, and dissonant musical chords while their BOLD brain responses were registered with functional magnetic resonance imaging. In both groups of listeners, minor and dissonant chords, compared with major chords, elicited enhanced responses in several brain areas, including the amygdala, retrosplenial cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum, during passive listening but not during memorization of the chords. The results indicate that (1) neural processing in emotion-related brain areas is activated even by single chords, (2) emotion processing is enhanced in the absence of cognitive requirements, and (3) musicians and nonmusicians do not differ in their neural responses to single musical chords during passive listening.

 

About the image:

The public domain image was made available through Wikipedia.