Department Blog

H/SS & Gov Info Services

EBSCO’s 2016 Serials Price Projections

October 7th, 2015 by Adam Siegel

Ebsco, based on conversations with and surveys of libraries, publishers, vendors, and others in the industry, estimates that serials inflation will run 4-6% next year.  The report also notes: “Libraries continue to spend large sums on publisher electronic journal packages (also known as ‘Big Deals,’) which continue to consume a higher percentage of the library spend year over year. Librarians continue to favor the purchase of e-content over print and packaged content over individual subscriptions.”

Congressional Record and Bills Online

September 15th, 2015 by Juri Stratford

The Library now has access to complete runs of the Congressional Record and the the Congressional Bills online.

The Congressional Record is a substantially verbatim account of remarks made during the proceedings of the House and Senate. It has been published by the Government Printing Office (GPO) since 1873. The Congressional Record is available through the UC Davis Mabie Law Library’s subscription through HeinOnline. This includes the bound Congressional Record for Vols. 1-157 pt. 10 (1873-2011) (43rd Congress, Special Session to 112th Congress, 1st Session) and the Congressional Record Daily Vols. 126-161 (1980-2015). The predecessors to the Congressional Record are also available through Heinonline.

The University Library also purchased the ProQuest Digital U.S. Bills and Resolutions, 1789-present.

The Murky Territory of Cites and Sites: The Threat of Academic Social Media?

June 21st, 2015 by Michael Winter

Thoughtful piece on how big, for profit publishers are feeling squeezed by sites like academia.edu

HIstory Associates: innovative private company doing historical research and archives management

May 28th, 2015 by Michael Winter

Founded at the end of the 1970s and innovating ever since, this private firm specializes in doing historical research and publishing its findings,  along with archives creation, organization, and management. They have worked with governmentagencies at all levels, major research libraries, museums,  and many private companies.  Watch History Associates informative, high-production value clip for an overview of the firm and its services.

Amsterdam Central Public Library

May 14th, 2015 by Michael Winter

AmsterdamCentralPublicLibrary

California’s Droughts: Past and Present

May 5th, 2015 by Juri Stratford

Although weather conditions constantly change, drought has been a recurring certainty in California’s climate for thousands of years as revealed by tree rings and geological records. The Department of water Resources has issued a new report, “California’s Most Significant Droughts: Comparing Historical and Recent Conditions,” with a wealth of information about California’s climate and lessons learned from previous droughts that may have a bearing on how Californians cope with the current drought.

The report was prepared by Jeanine Jones, DWR Deputy Drought Manager and Interstate Resources Manager. It compares the severity and impacts of California’s most significant droughts – 1929 to 1934, 1976 to 1977 and 1987 to 1992 – and also details the ongoing drought, which began in 2012.

The report covers a wide range of issues and highlights the need for better data about groundwater conditions, improved drought prediction capability and better drought preparedness for small water systems as California’s climate changes to drier and warmer conditions. The “California’s Most Significant Droughts” report can be accessed here.

Games Without Frontiers: Symposium, Library Exhibit, and Much More

April 21st, 2015 by Michael Winter

“Games Without Frontiers” is a multi-faceted initiative sponsored by the Program Committee of the Librarians Association of UC Davis.  It includes a comprehensive Library Exhibit, curated by Roberto Delgadillo, and other supporting materials, including Roberto’s comprehensive bibliography of the growing and increasingly significant “military-entertainment complex,” where gaming technology meets increasingly digitized means of waging war.  On Thursday April 16th the Program Committee also hosted a symposium of invited speakers addressing various aspects of this topic.  (For a response to and review reporting on and assessing the events of the symposium, see the recent review by Stephanie Maroney of the Davis Humanities Institute.) Interested parties should be sure to read the excellent and provocative introductory essay written especially for the occasion by Chris Hables Gray, one of the Symposium’s speakers.

The Allied Powers and the Holocaust: Upcoming Conference

February 4th, 2015 by Michael Winter

Organized by UCD Davis professor emeritus of Political Science Alexander Groth, and University of Santa Clara Law School professor Tony Tanke, this four-day conference , which will run from March 16 to March 19, 2015, at the Menachem Begin Center in Jerusalem, features presentations by a number of the best-known holocaust scholars.

Primary Sources for the Study of the Occupation of France, 1939-1945

January 16th, 2015 by Michael Winter

H-Net, a humanities research information network, carried recently an announcement of great interest to scholars working on occupied France and the French during World War II:  EGO 39-45 – War and occupation writings (1939-1945)Sponsored by the French government’s national research agency, the first phase of the project is a catalog of first person accounts, memoirs, autobiographical narratives,  notebooks, and private journals kept by a wide variety of persons during the occupation.  Database records include standard bibliographic descriptions along with fields identifying the libraries where items are held, and where available call numbers or indications of shelf-location. Future plans include links to the fulltext versions of the documents, as they are digitized and added to the online collection.

Senate Intelligence Committee Releases Report on Torture and the CIA

December 19th, 2014 by Juri Stratford

The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence has released the executive summary of its “Study of the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program.” The Senate release includes a 6-page foreword by committee chair Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), a 19-page list of 20 specific Findings and Conclusions, and a 499-page Executive Summary which details the development of the torture program after 9/11.

The official release of the report is available through FDSys.

Additional background information on the report is available through the National Security Archive.