Department Blog

H/SS & Gov Info Services

RESOURCE: Making Civics Real: A Workshop for Teachers

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

Civics can be a dreaded word for some students, but things just got a bit more interesting with this rather thoughtful and interesting video workshop created by the National Council for the Social Studies and the Center for Civic Education. Released as part of the Annenberg Media teacher resources, this eight part series helps teachers find ways to teach civics, complete with lesson plans and other materials. The workshop program videos include segments such as “Public Policy and the Federal Budget”, “Electoral Politics”, and “Freedom of Religion”. Visitors can also take advantage of the series website which contains additional teaching tools and support materials designed to complement the activities from each program.

 

Access: http://www.learner.org/resources/series177.html

RESOURCE: From Pi Beta Phi to Arrowmont

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

A fraternity for women, Pi Beta Phi, built a settlement school in Tennessee to honor the 50th anniversary of the fraternity. This website has digital collections of letters, diaries, and scrapbooks related to the founding of the school, as well as historical photos of the surrounding community and an interactive gallery of artwork that resides at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, the institution that the settlement school has become. Near the top of the page is a link to a “Timeline” that puts the fraternity’s founding and the opening of the school in the context of major world events. Visitors can start there to read a brief synopsis of each event on the timeline. To get look into what the school was like from a teacher’s’ perspectives, visitors should check out the beautifully digitized scrapbooks they made by clicking on the “Scrapbooks” link near the top of the page. Visitors should not miss the 360-degree image gallery to see every angle of some beautiful artworks that include a turned ash bowl and a raku vase. Click on “View Interactive Image” to start the art object turning, and then to slow it down or stop it or reverse direction, just drag the hand cursor onto the object. A zoom feature can also be accessed with the “+” or “-” at the bottom of the viewer.

 

Access: http://www.lib.utk.edu/arrowmont/

RESOURCE: The U.S. Religious Landscape Survey

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

Based on interviews with more than 35,000 American adults, this extensive survey by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life details the religious makeup, religious beliefs and practices as well as social and political attitudes of the American public. This online section includes dynamic tools that complement the full report. For a video overview and related material, go to the resource page.

 

Access: http://religions.pewforum.org/

RESOURCE: The Labyrinth: Resources for Medieval Studies

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

The Labyrinth: Resources for Medieval Studies provides free, organized access to electronic resources in medieval studies through a World Wide Web server at Georgetown University. The Labyrinth’s easy-to-use menus and links provide connections to databases, services, texts, and images on other servers around the world. This project not only provides an organizational structure for electronic resources in medieval studies, but also serves as a model for similar, collaborative projects in other fields of study. The Labyrinth project is open-ended and is designed to grow and change with new developments in technology and in medieval studies.

 

Access: http://labyrinth.georgetown.edu/

RESOURCE: The Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD)

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

The Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD) is an international organization dedicated to promoting the adoption, creation, use, dissemination and preservation of electronic analogues to the traditional paper-based theses and dissertations. This website contains information about the initiative, how to set up Electronic Theses and Dissertation (ETD) programs, how to create and locate ETDs, and current research in digital libraries related to NDLTD and ETDs.

 

Access: http://www.ndltd.org/

RESOURCE: Investigating Atheism

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

With their website, Investigating Atheism, the University of Cambridge hopes to add some clarity to the subject. Despite the attention recent books on atheism have received, they have had a mixed reception from the religious communities and from fellow atheists and agnostics. The goal of the site is to “set these contemporary “God Wars” in their historical context, and to offer a range of perspectives (from all sides) on the chief issues raised by the new atheists.” A good place to start exploring this very well organized website is by looking in the Selected Features box on the right side of the homepage. There, a visitor can get an overview of the issues and the players, by clicking on “Current Controversies”, “Atheist Politics”, “Atheism and Meaning”, “Arguments for Disbelief”, and “Links”. The “Links” section is divided up between Atheistic/Humanistic and Responses to the Debate. Visitors will find that studying atheism can be more complicated than it seems. The “History” tab points out the difficulty in recounting the history of atheism, because there is disagreement over its beginnings and players. Click on “Demographics” on the left side of the page to read about the obstacles faced when trying to get an accurate count of the number of atheists in the world today. Imperfect data is available, however, and such data suggests between 500 million and 750 million people don’t believe in God.

 

Access: http://www.investigatingatheism.info/

RESOURCE: Divining America: Religion in American History

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

Divining America: Religion in American History is designed to help teachers of American history bring their students to a greater understanding of the role religion has played in the development of the United States. It is based on the fact that American history and religion intersect importantly at various points—the Puritan migration to New England, for example, abolition, or the Civil Rights Movement. Divining America illuminates these intersections, for to understand such events fully, students must acquire some appreciation of their religious dimensions.

 

Access: http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/tserve/divam.htm

ANNOUNCEMENT: Share your University of California-Created Websites with Calisphere

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

Do you have a web site you’d like to share that has been created by a UC campus faculty member, librarian, or researcher? Would you like to raise the visibility of a web site you’ve created? Is it an online exhibit, curated collection, or thematically-based grouping of materials? Does the web site feature resources such as photographs, maps, historical documents, current articles and research, multimedia, electronic books, or other online resources?

 

Calisphere, managed by the California Digital Library (CDL), provides public access to primary source materials and freely available UC-created web sites. Calisphere offers more than 150,000 digitized items—including photographs, documents, newspaper pages, political cartoons, works of art, diaries, transcribed oral histories, advertising, and other unique cultural artifacts—selected from the libraries, archives and museums of the UC campuses, and from cultural heritage organizations across California. Calisphere is also a gateway to UC-created web sites that reflect the diverse interests and scholarship of UC, including the humanities, social sciences, math, and science resources. To date, Calisphere has published citations to over 500 websites. Calisphere is freely available to the public and is used by a broad range of people including UC students, K-12 educators and the general public.

 

Send Your URLs

 

Here’s how.

RESOURCE: The Catalogue of Digitized Medieval Manuscripts

May 30th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

The Catalogue of Digitized Medieval Manuscripts offers a simple and straightforward means to discover medieval manuscripts available on the web. The database provides links to a growing number of manuscripts. Basic information about the manuscripts is fully searchable, and users can also browse through the complete contents of the database. As the project develops, a richer body of information for each manuscript, and the texts in these codices, will be provided, where available.

 

The Catalogue first began to take form in Christopher Baswell’s talk at the MLA conference in December, 2005. Generous support by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (CMRS) at the University of California, Los Angeles, has enabled Professors Matthew Fisher and Christopher Baswell to develop this site, and make it publicly available in its current form through the CMRS web site. An additional grant from the UCHRI (University of California Humanities Research Institute) made possible additional data entry, and substantive refinements to the back-end technologies in place.

 

Access: http://manuscripts.cmrs.ucla.edu/index.php

RESOURCE: Religion in the News

May 29th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

The Leonard E. Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life was established at Trinity College in 1996 to advance knowledge and understanding of the varied roles that religious movements, institutions, and ideas play in the contemporary world; to explore challenges posed by religious pluralism and tensions between religious and secular values; and to examine the influence of religion on politics, civic culture, family life, gender roles, and other issues in the United States and elsewhere in the world. Non-sectarian and non-partisan, the Center sponsors public lectures, organizes conferences and workshops, contributes to the liberal arts curriculum, and supports the publication and dissemination of materials for both academic and general audiences. Its initiatives are designed to foster discussion of religion in public life both within the campus community and among various external publics.

The Center publishes Religion in the News, a thrice-yearly magazine that covers media reporting of religion.

 

Access: http://www.trincoll.edu/Academics/AcademicResources/values/greenbergcenter/default.htm