Department Blog

H/SS & Gov Info Services

Tomorrow is already today: “Heute für Morgen” at BMW

February 26th, 2013 by Michael Winter

BMW has introduced a new concept of the work group:  the average age of the workers can’t drop below 47, reflecting the shifting demographics of the advanced industrial societies.

Full story at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-21535772

New Open Access Project for the Humanities and Social Sciences

February 11th, 2013 by Alison Lanius

A new open access publishing project for humanists and social scientists is developing. According to an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education:

“A brand-spanking-new nonprofit organization, called the Open Library of Humanities, aims to create a humanities-and-social-sciences version of the successful Public Library of Science, or PLoS, which in the past decade has established itself as a major presence in open-access, peer-reviewed scientific publishing.” ( Howard, 2013)

From the Open Library of Humanities website:

“The mission of the OLH is to provide a platform for Open Access publishing that is:

• Reputable and respected through rigorous peer review

• Sustainable

• Digitally preserved and safely archived in perpetuity

• Non-profit

• Open in both monetary and permission terms

• Non-discriminatory (APCs are waiverable)

• Technically innovative in response to the needs of scholars and librarians

• A solution to the serials crisis”

For more information about OLH:

Website: https://www.openlibhums.org/

Press release: https://www.openlibhums.org/media/press-release/

Reference: Howard, J. (2013, January 19). Project aims to bring PLoS-style openness to the humanities. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved February 3, 2013, from http://chronicle.com/article/Project-Aims-to-Bring/136889/

Reposted from: http://blogs.lib.ucdavis.edu/blog/2013/02/11/new-open-access-project-for-the-humanities-and-social-sciences/

BBC News Item on the Crisis of Book Publishing

February 4th, 2013 by Michael Winter

From the article: “The printed book risks going the way of the cuneiform tablet, papyrus scroll or vellum parchment, say the doomsayers….but despite the huge growth in e-books in the past few years, the traditional publishing houses are not yet predicting the end of printed book.

In fact, figures for 2012 show that while e-book sales are still on the rise, the rate of decline in print sales has actually slowed.”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-21205372