Department Blog

H/SS & Gov Info Services

Citation Generators II

April 21st, 2014 by Michael Winter

In addition to the stand-alone citation generators mentioned in the previous post, there are now other ways to automatically generate a pre-formatted bibliographic reference, since these features are often built in to the periodicals indexing and abstracting services that the library subscribes to on behalf of the university’s  students, faculty, and staff.  There are many examples of such tools featuring a citation generator as part of the interface, including old favorites like PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, the MLA International Bibliography (and others from the ProQuest interface), and as many tools from the EBSCO package (including Academic Search Complete, America: History and Life, Historical Abstracts, and many others).  The technique is simple.  Once you are displaying a complete bibliographic reference on the screen, look for a box on the left hand side of the reference to check, then look on the right hand side for a link to get the citation generation process started.  (The actual position of this link varies a little from service to service, but usually is on the right).  If you’d like to try it out, see the link at the top of the welcome page of  behavioral science and cultural studies librarian David Michalski’s  Psychology subject guide and to go to PsycINFO.

Cttation Generators I

April 21st, 2014 by Michael Winter

Virtually every student has experienced the panic that sets in as the term draws to a close, and numerous written assignments–each requiring the paper’s bibliographic references to be formatted according to a specified standard– must be submitted. While there is, alas, no perfect fix for this problem, it has gotten alot easier recently with the availability of open access “citation generators”–web-based tools that allow the user to select the format needed (MLA, APA, Chicago), then input the descriptive data they have, and with a click or two or three produce a nicely formatted citation that can be copied and pasted into a list of references. Three of the better known  are “KnightCite,” “Son of Citation Machine,” and “Noodle Tools Express.” For links providing convenient access, see the column labelled “Citation Generators” at the bottom center an ingenious page crafted by Shields Library’s instruction librarian Melissa Browne.

Key Postwar German Literary Publication

April 7th, 2014 by Michael Winter

After Alfred Andersch and Hans Werner Richter were captured in Italy toward the end of the Second World War, they were sent to a prison camp in Rhode Island, where they worked on a publication directed at the “re-education” of German prisoners of war. When they returned to Germany in 1946, they revived it as Der Ruf – unabhängige Blätter der jungen Generation (same title with a different subtitle, reflecting their much broader literary ambitions). Shields Library is fortunate enough to own most of the issues of this publication, shelved at AP30 .R95 (the library has Volume 1, number 1 to Volume 3, number 18, 1946-1948). For additional details, see the entries for Andersch and Richter in the Neue deutsche Biographie, shelved in Shields, Humanities/Social Sciences Reference, DD85 .N4;  and  the entry for Richter in The Encyclopedia of Contermporary German Culture, shelved nearby at DD290.26 .E53 1999.

Although this publication was extremely successful,  it was published only under the official imprimatur and license of the U.S. Military Authority, under terms established during the Occupation during the early period just after the war.   Not long after the launch,  the U.S. authority–dissatisfied with the editors’ political orientations–abruptly cancelled the publication’s license, thus terminating it.   Andersch and Richter became, in connection with Der Ruf, very well-known, but they eventually became even better-known as founding spirits of  the “Gruppe 47,” a powerful organization of postwar German writers.