Department Blog

H/SS & Gov Info Services

Important new book on higher education: what is crucial?

August 27th, 2014 by Michael Winter

In a recent blog entry I called attention to UC President Janet Napolitano’s insightful take on the role of online services in research university education today. A recent addition to the library’s collections, currently on the new book shelf on the first floor of Shields near the picture window overlooking the Main Quad, both confirms and extends her analysis, by focussing on the question, what are major factors in a successful higher education experience?  (This new item is also available in digital format). Turns out, it isn’t the technology you choose to deliver the services, it’s whether or not you can create and sustain the kinds of conditions that favor the achievement motive and the desire to learn.  These conditions aren’t necessarily unrelated to available technologies, but they have mainly to do with bringing people together in the kinds of environments that stimulate them to learn. Too often, one-sided discussions about the alleged panaceas of online learning ignore this question entirely, and focus on the fact digital platforms can offer increasingly wide ranges of content.

How Objects Speak

August 13th, 2014 by David Michalski

Some of the more interesting classes that draw upon the rich collections of Shields Library over the years are those that study material culture. Professors in American Studies, Community Development, Sociology, Anthropology,  the History of Science, and University Writing frequently send their students to library resources to trace the changing interaction between objects and society. Student’s examining technologies of everyday life, such as eyeglasses, cell phone’s, or hair dryers draw upon the library’s primary and secondary literatures to reconstruct the social worlds through which these objects pass. The term papers the students write testify to the complex relations that surround things, and in the process of writing, students often find that it is in the social gathering that the object comes to life.

Peter Miller, in his recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, “How Objects Speak” traces the rise of interest in study of material culture and examines its contemporary appeal.

Milk Jar
From Miller’s article “How Objects Speak” Chronicle of Higher Education. 8/11/2014
Item: milk can
Material: Aluminum
Size: Diameter 32 cm, height of the main part 51 cm, and the upper part 15 cm.
Date: 1940?
Location: Warsaw, Poland.

Peter Miller has also gathered recent writing on material culture studies in his new edited book:
Cultural histories of the material world Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2013. See: Shields Library HM621 .C848 2013. It’s a good place to start, if one is interested in engaging the archaeology of the present.