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Games Without Frontiers: Symposium, Library Exhibit, and Much More

April 21st, 2015 by Michael Winter

“Games Without Frontiers” is a multi-faceted initiative sponsored by the Program Committee of the Librarians Association of UC Davis.  It includes a comprehensive Library Exhibit, curated by Roberto Delgadillo, and other supporting materials, including Roberto’s comprehensive bibliography of the growing and increasingly significant “military-entertainment complex,” where gaming technology meets increasingly digitized means of waging war.  On Thursday April 16th the Program Committee also hosted a symposium of invited speakers addressing various aspects of this topic.  (For a response to and review reporting on and assessing the events of the symposium, see the recent review by Stephanie Maroney of the Davis Humanities Institute.) Interested parties should be sure to read the excellent and provocative introductory essay written especially for the occasion by Chris Hables Gray, one of the Symposium’s speakers.

How Objects Speak

August 13th, 2014 by David Michalski

Some of the more interesting classes that draw upon the rich collections of Shields Library over the years are those that study material culture. Professors in American Studies, Community Development, Sociology, Anthropology,  the History of Science, and University Writing frequently send their students to library resources to trace the changing interaction between objects and society. Student’s examining technologies of everyday life, such as eyeglasses, cell phone’s, or hair dryers draw upon the library’s primary and secondary literatures to reconstruct the social worlds through which these objects pass. The term papers the students write testify to the complex relations that surround things, and in the process of writing, students often find that it is in the social gathering that the object comes to life.

Peter Miller, in his recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, “How Objects Speak” traces the rise of interest in study of material culture and examines its contemporary appeal.

Milk Jar
From Miller’s article “How Objects Speak” Chronicle of Higher Education. 8/11/2014
Item: milk can
Material: Aluminum
Size: Diameter 32 cm, height of the main part 51 cm, and the upper part 15 cm.
Date: 1940?
Location: Warsaw, Poland.

Peter Miller has also gathered recent writing on material culture studies in his new edited book:
Cultural histories of the material world Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2013. See: Shields Library HM621 .C848 2013. It’s a good place to start, if one is interested in engaging the archaeology of the present.

Surprise academic bestseller by French political economist

May 12th, 2014 by Michael Winter

Not many academic books, like French economist Thomas Piketty’s new work, Capital in the 21st Century, manage to get much public attention, but a recent interview of Paul Krugman, conducted by Bill Moyers, tells the story of a new book that falls into that category. Not surprisingly, the library’s copy is checked out, but of course can be recalled from the catalog record;and in any event the library owns a number of earlier works  by Piketty and his colleagues on similar topics.

Key Postwar German Literary Publication

April 7th, 2014 by Michael Winter

After Alfred Andersch and Hans Werner Richter were captured in Italy toward the end of the Second World War, they were sent to a prison camp in Rhode Island, where they worked on a publication directed at the “re-education” of German prisoners of war. When they returned to Germany in 1946, they revived it as Der Ruf – unabhängige Blätter der jungen Generation (same title with a different subtitle, reflecting their much broader literary ambitions). Shields Library is fortunate enough to own most of the issues of this publication, shelved at AP30 .R95 (the library has Volume 1, number 1 to Volume 3, number 18, 1946-1948). For additional details, see the entries for Andersch and Richter in the Neue deutsche Biographie, shelved in Shields, Humanities/Social Sciences Reference, DD85 .N4;  and  the entry for Richter in The Encyclopedia of Contermporary German Culture, shelved nearby at DD290.26 .E53 1999.

Although this publication was extremely successful,  it was published only under the official imprimatur and license of the U.S. Military Authority, under terms established during the Occupation during the early period just after the war.   Not long after the launch,  the U.S. authority–dissatisfied with the editors’ political orientations–abruptly cancelled the publication’s license, thus terminating it.   Andersch and Richter became, in connection with Der Ruf, very well-known, but they eventually became even better-known as founding spirits of  the “Gruppe 47,” a powerful organization of postwar German writers.

Modern Language Association (MLA) International Bibliography Video Tutorials

February 18th, 2014 by Michael Winter

The MLA International Bibliography has just announced a new video tutorial series on different ways of searching the bibliography. New tutorials will be released every few months.  Click here for links to the currently available tutorials. The tutorials cover both the ProQuest and the EBSCO interfaces.

Behold the Editor, increasingly important, yet undervalued says Alan Rauch

January 22nd, 2014 by David Michalski

Ecce Emendator: The Cost of Knowledge for Scholarly Editors.  

“…How is it that the role of editor has seemed to have disappeared? And how is it that the tremendous labor performed by editors has essentially been erased or degraded by the very system that depends on us?…”

Alan Rauch, past president of president of the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ), and founding editor of Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology writes about the place of academic journal Editors in the new political economy of knowledge.
https://chroniclevitae.com/news/285-ecce-emendator-the-cost-of-knowledge-for-scholarly-editors

NYT: Professor Says He Has Solved a Mystery Over a Slave’s Novel

September 19th, 2013 by David Michalski

In this New York Times article, Gregg Hecimovich, chairman of the English department at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, is reported to have solved a literary and cultural mystery by identifying the author of The Bondswoman’s Narrative: Hannah Bond, and naming her literary influences by researching wills, diaries, handwritten almanacs and public records.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/19/books/professor-says-he-has-solved-a-mystery-over-a-slaves-novel.html

See also–
Crafts, Hannah.
bondwoman’s narrative / Hannah Crafts ; edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
New York : Warner Books, c2002.
Shields Library PS1449.C673 B66 2002 Regular Loan

In search of Hannah Crafts : critical essays on The bondwoman’s narrative / Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Hollis Robbins, eds.
New York : BasicCivitas, c2004.
Shields Library PS1449.C673 B6634 2004 Regular Loan

Hecimovich, Gregg A.Searching for Hannah Crafts in Eastern North Carolina. North Carolina Literary Review 16 (2007): 43-54.

Williams, Adebayo. “Of Human Bondage and Literary Triumphs: Hannah Crafts and the Morphology of the Slave Narrative.” Research in African Literatures 34.1 (Spring 2003): 137ff

All That is Solid Does Not Melt in the Cloud: Founding a Postcolonial Digital Humanities

March 18th, 2013 by David Michalski

Postcolonial Digital Humanities is an initiative seeking to bring critiques of colonialism, imperialism, and globalization to bear on the digital humanities. Questioning the neutrality of digital codes and systems, this project asks how historic and contemporary colonial relations of race, class, gender, sexuality and disability influence the digital world, the digital archive and libraries of the future.

Led by post-colonial scholars Roopika Risam and Adeline Koh, the Postcolonial Digital Humanities initiative positions itself as “an emergent field of study invested in decolonizing the digital, foregrounding anti-colonial thought, and disrupting salutatory narratives of globalization and technological progress.”
To learn more about this interesting and important work read the group’s FOUNDING PRINCIPLES
http://dhpoco.wordpress.com/founding-principles/

UC Davis Scholars have access to growing collection of rare newspapers and documentary sources via The Center for Research Libraries (CRL).

December 12th, 2012 by David Michalski

UC Davis Scholars have access to growing collection of rare newspapers and documentary sources via The Center for Research Libraries (CRL).

Since 1973, the University Library at UC Davis has extended its collections through its membership with The Center for Research Libraries (CRL) an international consortium of university, college, and independent research libraries. Founded in 1949, CRL supports advanced research and teaching in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences by preserving and making available to scholars the primary source material critical to those disciplines.

CRL acquires and preserves newspapers, journals, documents, archives, and other traditional and digital resources from a global network of sources. Most materials acquired are from outside the United States, and many are from five “emerging” regions of the world: Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Latin America.

Learn more about the Center for Research Libraries and Explore your collections.
http://www.crl.edu/

Here is a list of newly acquired microfilm sets now available for digital delivery through Inter-Library Loan.

CRL members nominated and voted for the following sets in the 2013 program

Bod-ljon par Tibet Daily(1961–66; 1979; 1982; 1984; 1998; 2002; and 2005–06)

* 26 reels;

* Bod-ljon par Tibet Daily is the main Tibetan language newspaper published by the Chinese Communist Party in Tibet. This is a primary source for the study of Tibet over the last 50-60 years.

British Intelligence on the North-West Frontier 1901-1949: India Office Political and Secret Reports on Tribes and Terrorism. British Library and India Office Collections.

* 33 reels

* Part of the IDC series British Intelligence Files, the materials in this collection document British attempts to impose order on the tribal territories. With details of policy initiatives familiar to contemporary observers of the current events, the files describe imperial struggles with jihadist movements and show how local leaders were able to stay out of British hands. The material covers the period from the 1901 creation of the North-West Frontier Province to 1949, by which time the Province had become an administrative region of Pakistan.

This primary source is essential to understanding the modern history of Islam in Pakistan and India and valuable for research on British diplomacy and the history of attempts to deal with terrorism in the colonies.

Foreign Office Files for Post-War Europe, Series Two: The Treaty of Rome and European Integration, 1957-1960

* 73 reels
* Series two of the Foreign Office Files for Post-War Europe comes in three parts and contains files from the Public Record Office Class FO 371. This set documents how the European Economic Community grew and rebuilt Europe after World War II.

Newspapers from Nazi Germany (1929–45)

* 65 reels

* Titles of newspapers:
o Völkischer Beobachter (Berlin, Germany: Norddeutsche Ausg.).
CRL will purchase: 1929–June 1940; Sept.–Dec.1940; March 1941; 1942–March 1944; 1945.
o Deutsche allgemeine Zeitung (Berlin, Germany)
CRL will purchase: Apr. 13,1929–Sept. 1929; Apr. 26–28, 1932; Mar. 10–June 17, 1933; Nov. 3–9, 1939; March 10–12, 1945.
o Der Angriff (Berlin, Germany)
CRL will purchase: May–Aug. 1932; 1934–April 24, 1945.

Knickerbocker Press Newspaper

* 190 reels
* The Knickerbocker Press Newspaper is a regional newspaper from eastern upstate New York. This area has a long history as a hub for transportation (first steamboat line, the Erie Canal, a railway hub, and the first municipal airport in the United States) thus making it ideal for commerce and industry. It also became a center of political power. At one point, this newspaper carried the most advertisements for the Albany, N.Y. area and was important to industries wishing to reach “able-to-buy” markets. The newspaper advertised itself as a quality newspaper that served “society” readers.

Papers of Emma Hart Willard, 1787-1870

* 25 reels
* This set includes personal papers and correspondence to and from the 19th-century women’s educator Emma Hart Willard.

Papers of the War Refugee Board

* 59 reels
* Established by executive order no. 9417, the War Refugee Board (WRB) aided victims of Nazi oppression. This collection contains correspondence, memoranda, reports, indexes, and related papers pertaining to the WRB policies, programs and operations in 1944 and 1945.

Qing dai Xinjiang dang an xuan ji (清代新疆档案选辑)

* 91 volumes
* These volumes present Chinese language archival materials from the First Historical Archive of China, which houses archival materials of the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing governments (1644–1911). This collection is the first comprehensive published collection of archival materials regarding Xinjiang or Chinese Central Asia during the Qing period. The topics it covers are wide ranging, including but not limited to politics, social development, economic development, trade, agrarian development, labor relations, culture and religion, activities of local Islamic saints, etc. of Xinjiang.

The Rafu shimpo microfilm

* This is a continuing purchase that will be acquired in three parts:
o First part purchased, 132 reels (July 1914–49)
o Second part purchased, 143 reels (1950–79)
o Third part purchased, 129 reels (1980–2009)

* The Rafu shimpo is a Japanese-American newspaper from Los Angeles and was published both in English and Japanese. This purchase will replace fragile CRL hard copy holdings and extend CRL’s microfilm holdings. Some comments from voters revealed how important this set was for the “burgeoning field of Asian American history/studies,” as it documents the “Japanese immigrant experience in the US.”

Satirische Zeitschriften (Satirical Periodicals)

* 1355 fiche
* The editors of these German illustrated satirical periodicals defied threats and censorship to lampoon the local, national, and international situations of the time. They covered historical events that occurred from the time of Metternich through Wilhelm II to Hitler.

Sexualerleben und Körperkultur (Sexual Experience and Body Culture: Deutschsprachige Publikationen, 1880-1932.) Suppl. 1 2007

* 580 microfiches
* Sexualerleben und Körperkultur is a German language publication that was published between 1880 and 1932. This supplemental set provides a glimpse into the German culture and their views on sexual experience and modernity.

Si Fa Gong Bao (司法公报)

* 88 volumes
* This publication covers the entire run of legislative bulletin at the national level throughout the Republican Minguo period, 1912–48.

What Was the University Press?: UMP’s Douglas Armato on the Scholarly Monograph

November 14th, 2012 by David Michalski

Douglas Armato, director of University of the University of Minnesota Press discussed the role of the University Press in Scholarly Communication in his presentation at the 2012 Charleston Conference on Issues in Book and Serial Acquisition.

This blog entry on the University of Minnesota Press website summarizes his interesting take.