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How Objects Speak

August 13th, 2014 by David Michalski

Some of the more interesting classes that draw upon the rich collections of Shields Library over the years are those that study material culture. Professors in American Studies, Community Development, Sociology, Anthropology,  the History of Science, and University Writing frequently send their students to library resources to trace the changing interaction between objects and society. Student’s examining technologies of everyday life, such as eyeglasses, cell phone’s, or hair dryers draw upon the library’s primary and secondary literatures to reconstruct the social worlds through which these objects pass. The term papers the students write testify to the complex relations that surround things, and in the process of writing, students often find that it is in the social gathering that the object comes to life.

Peter Miller, in his recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, “How Objects Speak” traces the rise of interest in study of material culture and examines its contemporary appeal.

Milk Jar
From Miller’s article “How Objects Speak” Chronicle of Higher Education. 8/11/2014
Item: milk can
Material: Aluminum
Size: Diameter 32 cm, height of the main part 51 cm, and the upper part 15 cm.
Date: 1940?
Location: Warsaw, Poland.

Peter Miller has also gathered recent writing on material culture studies in his new edited book:
Cultural histories of the material world Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2013. See: Shields Library HM621 .C848 2013. It’s a good place to start, if one is interested in engaging the archaeology of the present.

All That is Solid Does Not Melt in the Cloud: Founding a Postcolonial Digital Humanities

March 18th, 2013 by David Michalski

Postcolonial Digital Humanities is an initiative seeking to bring critiques of colonialism, imperialism, and globalization to bear on the digital humanities. Questioning the neutrality of digital codes and systems, this project asks how historic and contemporary colonial relations of race, class, gender, sexuality and disability influence the digital world, the digital archive and libraries of the future.

Led by post-colonial scholars Roopika Risam and Adeline Koh, the Postcolonial Digital Humanities initiative positions itself as “an emergent field of study invested in decolonizing the digital, foregrounding anti-colonial thought, and disrupting salutatory narratives of globalization and technological progress.”
To learn more about this interesting and important work read the group’s FOUNDING PRINCIPLES
http://dhpoco.wordpress.com/founding-principles/

What Was the University Press?: UMP’s Douglas Armato on the Scholarly Monograph

November 14th, 2012 by David Michalski

Douglas Armato, director of University of the University of Minnesota Press discussed the role of the University Press in Scholarly Communication in his presentation at the 2012 Charleston Conference on Issues in Book and Serial Acquisition.

This blog entry on the University of Minnesota Press website summarizes his interesting take.

Fall Research Workshops: Social and Cultural Studies

September 6th, 2012 by David Michalski

Social and Cultural Studies Library Research Workshop

w/ David Michalski, MLS, PhD. (michalski@ucdavis.edu)

1st Date: Wednesday, October 17, 2012
Time: 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Place: Library Instruction Lab, 1st Floor Peter J. Shields Library (near Reserves Desk)

2nd Date: Thursday, October 18, 2012
Time: 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Place: Library Instruction Lab, 1st Floor Peter J. Shields Library (near Reserves Desk)

This workshop invites graduate students, faculty and other researchers to see and practice with the latest research tools available. Learn effectively ways to construct literature reviews, frame new research questions, and navigate and evaluate the wide variety of information sources available at the University of California and beyond.

Topics covered include:

The latest in database searching (including the Proquest transisiton databases),
Citation analysis and cited reference searches,
Locating primary source material,
and the use of interdisciplinary and specialized reference works.

Participants are encouraged to bring along research projects as well as any questions they have about the University Library.
Let us learn how we can serve you better.

David Michalski is a UC Davis Librarian subject specialist in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department responsible to these departments and programs: Sociology, Psychology, Human, Community and Regional Development, Geography, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, African and African American Studies, Asian American Studies and Cultural Studies.

For more info see: http://people.lib.ucdavis.edu/~davidm/mycard.html

Featured eBook: The handbook of critical intercultural communication

January 27th, 2012 by David Michalski

The handbook of critical intercultural communication
edited by Thomas K. Nakayama and Rona Tamiko Halualani
Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010


Online link { Wiley Online Library. Restricted to UC campuses } http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781444390681 ;

Critical Intercultural Communication Studies (pages 1–16)
Rona Tamiko Halualani and Thomas K. Nakayama

Part I: Critical Junctures and Reflections in Our Field – A Revisiting

Writing the Intellectual History of Intercultural Communication (pages 21–33)
Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz

Critical Reflections on Culture and Critical Intercultural Communication (pages 34–52)
Dreama G. Moon

Reflecting Upon “Enlarging Conceptual Boundaries: A Critique of Research in Intercultural Communication” (pages 53–58)
Alberto González

Intercultural Communication and Dialectics Revisited (pages 59–83)
Judith N. Martin and Thomas K. Nakayama

Reflections on “Problematizing ‘Nation’ in Intercultural Communication Research” (pages 84–97)
Kent A. Ono

Reflections on “Bridging Paradigms: How not to Throw out the Baby of Collective Representation with the Functionalist Bathwater in Critical Intercultural Communication” (pages 98–111)
S. Lily Mendoza

Revisiting the Borderlands of Critical Intercultural Communication (pages 112–129)
Leda Cooks

Expanding the Circumference of Intercultural Communication Study (pages 130–146)
William J. Starosta and Guo-Ming Chen

Part II: Critical Dimensions in Intercultural Communication Studies
You have free access to this contentPart Introduction (pages 147–148)

Internationalizing Critical Race Communication Studies (pages 149–170)
Raka Shome

Re-Imagining Intercultural Communication in the Context of Globalization (pages 171–189)
Kathryn Sorrells

Culture as Text and Culture as Theory (pages 190–215)
Yoshitaka Miike

Entering the Inter (pages 216–226)
Aimee Carrillo Rowe

Speaking of Difference (pages 227–247)
Crispin Thurlow

Speaking Against the Hegemony of English (pages 248–269)
Yukio Tsuda

Coculturation (pages 270–285)
Melissa L. Curtin

Public Memories in the Shadow of the Other (pages 286–310)
Jolanta A. Drzewiecka

Critical Intercultural Communication, Remembrances of George Washington Williams, and the Rediscovery of Léopold II’s “Crimes Against Humanity” (pages 311–331)
Marouf Hasian

Part III: Critical Topics in Intercultural Communication Studies

Situating Gender in Critical Intercultural Communication Studies (pages 335–347)
Lara Lengel and Scott C. Martin

Identity and Difference (pages 348–363)
Ronald L. Jackson and Jamie Moshin

Br(other) in the Classroom (pages 364–381)
Bryant Keith Alexander

When Frankness Goes Funky (pages 382–399)
Jim Perkinson

Iterative Hesitancies and Latinidad (pages 400–416)
Bernadette Marie Calafell and Shane T. Moreman

We Got Game (pages 417–445)
Lisa A. Flores, Karen Lee Ashcraft and Tracy Marafiote

It Really Isn’t about you (pages 446–460)
John T. Warren

Critical Reflections on a Pedagogy of Ability (pages 461–471)
Deanna L. Fassett

The Scarlet Letter, Vigilantism, and the Politics of Sadism (pages 472–482)
Richard Morris

Authenticity and Identity in the Portable Homeland (pages 483–494)
Victoria Chen

Layers of Nikkei (pages 495–516)
Etsuko Kinefuchi

Placing South Asian Digital Diasporas in Second Life (pages 517–533)
Radhika Gajjala

“The Creed of the White Kid” (pages 534–548)
Melissa Steyn

A Critical Reflection on an Intercultural Communication Workshop (pages 549–564)
Hsin-I Cheng

“Quit Whining and Tell me about your Experiences!” (pages 565–584)
Sara DeTurkt

A Proposal for Concerted Collaboration Between Critical Scholars of Intercultural and Organizational Communication (pages 585–592)
Brenda J. Allen

Conclusion (pages 593–600)
Thomas K. Nakayama and Rona Tamiko Halualani

RESOURCE: Oregon Multicultural Archives Digital Collection

August 31st, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

 Ethnic minorities in Oregon are the subject of this Oregon State University Library website and the collection “consists of images that document the lives and activities of ethnic minorities in Oregon.” With its streamlined homepage, visitors can focus on the collection and how to search or browse through it. Visitors are also welcome to contribute information on any unidentified photographs, by clicking on “Contact Us”, near the bottom of the homepage. In addition, visitors can also click on the “Browse” link to see every one of the 239 items in the collection. Those users with something more specific in mind should use the “Quick Links” drop down box in the top right hand corner of the homepage. Some of the subject areas that can be searched for are “African Americans”, “Indians of North America”, “Mexican Americans”, “Political Parades and Rallies”, and “Powwows”. The “Indexes” available to search are organized into headings like “Photographer”, “Subject” and “Geographic”, and they can be found below the “Quick Links” drop down box.

 

Access: http://digitalcollections.library.oregonstate.edu/cdm4/client/cultural/index.html

RESOURCE: Calisphere: California Cultures

May 29th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

The University of California Libraries has digitized a collection of images of four ethnic groups in California that have been historically underrepresented by digitized primary source materials. In order to learn about diversity in California in a historical context, visitors should start by checking out the Historical Essays highlighted at the top of the site’s homepage. These essays provide brief historical overviews and related images and begin with the period “Before 1768: Pre-Columbian California” and end with the period “1921-Present: Modern California”. Once visitors have familiarized themselves with the history they should move on to the main event. The images of the four groups, “African Americans”, “Asian Americans”, “Hispanic Americans”, and “Native Americans” can be found under their own tabs at the top of the page, and are further divided into subcategories. On the far right side of the page are several free Lesson Plans for grades 4-12 that emphasize these underrepresented California cultures, and utilize this database of images and documents. Some of the lessons include “Stealing Home: How Race Relations, Politics and Baseball Transformed Chavez Ravine” and “Los Californios: California’s Spanish, Native American and African Heritage”.

 

Access: http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/calcultures/

Paper-Aid: Calling all term paper authors, we can help.

May 12th, 2009 by David Michalski

Did you know the Humanities and Social Science Librarians offer research assistance to undergraduates working on term papers? If your professors require a term paper based on peer-reviewed research, we can help. We will show you how to engage the pressing questions, review the literature, evaluate sources, and assembly the evidence you need for term paper success.

Contact us by email, or come by the Humanities Social Sciences and Government Information Reference desk on the 2nd Floor of the Peter J. Shields Library and schedule an appointment with a librarian who knows your field. Appointments for one-on-one meetings usually last about 30 minutes, but can prepare you for a career of self-directed and critical information research. Past practice shows that Paper-Aid sessions improve grades.  Take advantage of this unique service by making an appointment your subject specialist librarian.

RESOURCE: Multicultural Literature in the United States Today

April 9th, 2009 by Roberto C. Delgadillo

 

The latest edition of eJournal USA focuses on distinguished American writers from various ethnic backgrounds who add immeasurably to mutual understanding and appreciation through tales of their native lands and their experiences as Americans.

 

Access: Multicultural Literature in the United States Today