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Amsterdam Central Public Library

May 14th, 2015 by Michael Winter

AmsterdamCentralPublicLibrary

Why Bother to Learn Foreign Languages?

July 24th, 2014 by Michael Winter

As the fashionable cant of the day has it, who needs foreign languages?–the kind of sentiments by which we know and love such towering intellects as Lawrence Summers and too many others to mention. All the essentially insightful counterarguments to the contrary–national security, globalization, improving diplomatic relations, working with crucial trading partners, etc–a recent article on the subject kind of hit the nail on the head by observing that “Maybe it’s less about knowing how to conjugate verbs, and more about just not being an asshole.”

Google Translate Gets Big Laughs

June 25th, 2014 by Michael Winter

Google Translate can prove useful–but watch out for hilarious, unintentionally absurd renderings.Try out a few phrases and see what you think.  For example, I entered a German language sentence containing the name of a friend—Hanno Kaiser–and it gave me “Hanno Emperor.”  And by way of Englishing the well-known French language phrase “Tu sais meme pas a quoi s’en tenir,” it gives “You know what has not even stick.”

Seeking New Paths to Open Access in the Humanities

February 21st, 2014 by David Michalski

Earlier this week, I attended webinar, called “Open Access in the Humanities” led by Rupert Gatti. Dr. Gatti is a Fellow in Economics at Trinity College, Cambridge and Co-Founder and Director of Open Book Publishers. The presentation outlined the landscape and the challenges of Open Access in the humanities.

One point that resonated with me, given the centrality of monographs to the humanities, was a statistic that showed the relative dearth of new open access academic books in relation to new journal titles. Clearly there are combinations of reasons preventing a more robust move to open access in the humanities, both economic (the problem of financial capital: books (e or print) are more labor intensive) and sociocultural (the problem of cultural capital: in that humanities books are awarded status and prestige through publishing houses). Gatti’s presentation took on these challenges by seeking a sustainable ways to address these conditions, showing some exciting options moving forward.

The bulk of his presentation was spent on Open Books Publishers, a new publishing project for peer-reviewed open access monographs, which he directs. (See Open Books Publishers:

http://www.openbookpublishers.com/section/25/1/faqs ) This outfit has only published a few books to date, but their economic model, which includes a mixture of revenue from big name supporters, hard-copy and alternative format sales, and voluntary author-generated publication grant funding makes them an interesting new player in field.

Gatti also outlined other important initiatives. One of these was Knowledge Unlatched, (See: http://www.knowledgeunlatched.org/ ) a project which seeks long-term cost savings for institutions by sharing the costs of making HSS monographs available on a Creative Commons license. UC Libraries is part in one of their pilot projects. Another was Unglue It, ( https://unglue.it/about/) a project designed to help individuals and institutions join together to liberate specific ebooks “crowd-funding ” payments to authors and publishers so they they will relicense their works under Creative Commons licenses.” 

It is exciting to see these different economic models being tried. While I can’t say they will all achieve the sustainability they desire, it is clear that their aim is to create cooperatives to address real costs.

This webinar was sponsored by UKSG, a group formally that United Kingdom Serials Group. UKSG has evolved into a network that encourages “the exchange of ideas on scholarly communication…spanning the wide range of interests and activities across the scholarly information community of librarians, publishers, intermediaries and technology vendors. More about their activities can be found here: http://www.uksg.org/

The Book as Social Form: On the Value of Peer-Review and Editorial Critique

July 22nd, 2013 by David Michalski

As the information environment shifts, and new publishing opportunities are presented to researchers, librarians and scholars planning on how to move forward need to reflect on the relationship between the research library, the scholar/author, and the functions of the academic press.

Having sheparded to publication some of the most remarkable academic books of recent years, Ken Wissoker, the editorial director at Duke University Press, is in a good position to explain the added-value the academic press provides to this relationship. And in an insightful blog post, he does just that, focusing on the work behind the scenes that has helped to make Duke University Press as successfull as it has become.

In a world a-buzz over the technologies of self-publishing and research data repositories, Wissoker reminds us of the importance peer review and editorial guidance have on the shape of the humanities and qualitative social sciences. Questioning arguments which herald the demise of university press book, he articulates a key difference between a report on one’s research and the proper work of the book.

Publication in the humanities and social sciences isn’t the reporting of research. It’s the production of a compelling argument, based on a combination of research and interpretation.”

By drawing our attention to this process, Wissoker contributes to a wider critique of an industry that too often sees knowledge as the direct result of the exchange of information, and libraries and publishers simply as the machinery of information transfer. By opening up the labor of the editorial and review process, he reveals the social form of the book. Rather than seeing it simply as a physical or digital vessel for content, one that serves as an obstacle between the reader and her or his access to pure research, the book is reimagined as dialogue between facts, interpretations and critical arguments, a conversation that is aided by the work of external reviewers and editors. In this light, the best books in the humanities and social sciences, not only transport facts, but take the reader through the construction of those facts by unfolding both the research process and the relationships which affect its trajectory.

Wissoker’s argument in favor of a broader recognition of the social relationships of knowledge production may positively influence the way we imagine libraries too. It may help us to better organize the information environment of tomorrow by bringing into focus one the library’s most essential roles, its function as a generator and facillitator of compelling arguments.


See Ken Wissoker’s article posted on Scholarly Kitchen here:
http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2013/07/22/the-relationship-between-research-and-publication-or-why-libraries-should-buy-more-first-books-than-any-others/

For more of Ken Wissoker’s thoughts, see the interviews Adeline Koh has conducted with him for the Chronicle of Higher Education, beginning with “On Monographs, Libraries and Blogging”. See:
http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/what-is-the-future-of-the-monograph-a-conversation-with-duke-university-press-part-one/48263

We don’t have a price problem, we have a cost problem.

May 8th, 2013 by Michael Winter

Read Richard Poynder’s excellent and thoughtful article on how large research libraries have been receiving their journal content in the form of huge all-inclusive provider-based bundles (the “big deal’ model so loved by the big providers has however not proved to be such a good deal for anyone else). And if you think “Open Access” is the solution to the problem, you should read what the author has to say about that as well.

Fall Research Workshops: Social and Cultural Studies

September 6th, 2012 by David Michalski

Social and Cultural Studies Library Research Workshop

w/ David Michalski, MLS, PhD. (michalski@ucdavis.edu)

1st Date: Wednesday, October 17, 2012
Time: 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Place: Library Instruction Lab, 1st Floor Peter J. Shields Library (near Reserves Desk)

2nd Date: Thursday, October 18, 2012
Time: 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Place: Library Instruction Lab, 1st Floor Peter J. Shields Library (near Reserves Desk)

This workshop invites graduate students, faculty and other researchers to see and practice with the latest research tools available. Learn effectively ways to construct literature reviews, frame new research questions, and navigate and evaluate the wide variety of information sources available at the University of California and beyond.

Topics covered include:

The latest in database searching (including the Proquest transisiton databases),
Citation analysis and cited reference searches,
Locating primary source material,
and the use of interdisciplinary and specialized reference works.

Participants are encouraged to bring along research projects as well as any questions they have about the University Library.
Let us learn how we can serve you better.

David Michalski is a UC Davis Librarian subject specialist in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department responsible to these departments and programs: Sociology, Psychology, Human, Community and Regional Development, Geography, Women and Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies, African and African American Studies, Asian American Studies and Cultural Studies.

For more info see: http://people.lib.ucdavis.edu/~davidm/mycard.html

Pew Center study of readers of ebooks

May 1st, 2012 by Michael Winter

Pew study finds that “librarians and library websites” are the two places contemporary readers are the least likely to seek reading recommendations.  Story, data, graphics, etc., at:

http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2012/04/04/the-rise-of-e-reading/

Digital Public Library of America

April 13th, 2012 by Michael Winter

http://dp.la/

Featured eBook: The handbook of critical intercultural communication

January 27th, 2012 by David Michalski

The handbook of critical intercultural communication
edited by Thomas K. Nakayama and Rona Tamiko Halualani
Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010


Online link { Wiley Online Library. Restricted to UC campuses } http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781444390681 ;

Critical Intercultural Communication Studies (pages 1–16)
Rona Tamiko Halualani and Thomas K. Nakayama

Part I: Critical Junctures and Reflections in Our Field – A Revisiting

Writing the Intellectual History of Intercultural Communication (pages 21–33)
Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz

Critical Reflections on Culture and Critical Intercultural Communication (pages 34–52)
Dreama G. Moon

Reflecting Upon “Enlarging Conceptual Boundaries: A Critique of Research in Intercultural Communication” (pages 53–58)
Alberto González

Intercultural Communication and Dialectics Revisited (pages 59–83)
Judith N. Martin and Thomas K. Nakayama

Reflections on “Problematizing ‘Nation’ in Intercultural Communication Research” (pages 84–97)
Kent A. Ono

Reflections on “Bridging Paradigms: How not to Throw out the Baby of Collective Representation with the Functionalist Bathwater in Critical Intercultural Communication” (pages 98–111)
S. Lily Mendoza

Revisiting the Borderlands of Critical Intercultural Communication (pages 112–129)
Leda Cooks

Expanding the Circumference of Intercultural Communication Study (pages 130–146)
William J. Starosta and Guo-Ming Chen

Part II: Critical Dimensions in Intercultural Communication Studies
You have free access to this contentPart Introduction (pages 147–148)

Internationalizing Critical Race Communication Studies (pages 149–170)
Raka Shome

Re-Imagining Intercultural Communication in the Context of Globalization (pages 171–189)
Kathryn Sorrells

Culture as Text and Culture as Theory (pages 190–215)
Yoshitaka Miike

Entering the Inter (pages 216–226)
Aimee Carrillo Rowe

Speaking of Difference (pages 227–247)
Crispin Thurlow

Speaking Against the Hegemony of English (pages 248–269)
Yukio Tsuda

Coculturation (pages 270–285)
Melissa L. Curtin

Public Memories in the Shadow of the Other (pages 286–310)
Jolanta A. Drzewiecka

Critical Intercultural Communication, Remembrances of George Washington Williams, and the Rediscovery of Léopold II’s “Crimes Against Humanity” (pages 311–331)
Marouf Hasian

Part III: Critical Topics in Intercultural Communication Studies

Situating Gender in Critical Intercultural Communication Studies (pages 335–347)
Lara Lengel and Scott C. Martin

Identity and Difference (pages 348–363)
Ronald L. Jackson and Jamie Moshin

Br(other) in the Classroom (pages 364–381)
Bryant Keith Alexander

When Frankness Goes Funky (pages 382–399)
Jim Perkinson

Iterative Hesitancies and Latinidad (pages 400–416)
Bernadette Marie Calafell and Shane T. Moreman

We Got Game (pages 417–445)
Lisa A. Flores, Karen Lee Ashcraft and Tracy Marafiote

It Really Isn’t about you (pages 446–460)
John T. Warren

Critical Reflections on a Pedagogy of Ability (pages 461–471)
Deanna L. Fassett

The Scarlet Letter, Vigilantism, and the Politics of Sadism (pages 472–482)
Richard Morris

Authenticity and Identity in the Portable Homeland (pages 483–494)
Victoria Chen

Layers of Nikkei (pages 495–516)
Etsuko Kinefuchi

Placing South Asian Digital Diasporas in Second Life (pages 517–533)
Radhika Gajjala

“The Creed of the White Kid” (pages 534–548)
Melissa Steyn

A Critical Reflection on an Intercultural Communication Workshop (pages 549–564)
Hsin-I Cheng

“Quit Whining and Tell me about your Experiences!” (pages 565–584)
Sara DeTurkt

A Proposal for Concerted Collaboration Between Critical Scholars of Intercultural and Organizational Communication (pages 585–592)
Brenda J. Allen

Conclusion (pages 593–600)
Thomas K. Nakayama and Rona Tamiko Halualani