Department Blog

Physical Sciences & Engineering Library

Data Rights and Data Wrongs workshop

November 6th, 2014 by Robert Heyer-Gray

Data Rights & Data Wrongs

REGISTRATION IS OPEN
Register here or go to

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/data-rights-data-wrongs-tickets-14079810091

Data Rights pic copy

 

Date & Time: December 10, 2014 from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Location: MPR, Student Community Center, UC Davis

Scholars are increasingly subject to pressures from funding bodies, disciplinary norms, professional and personal ethics, and institutional directives to share their research data and make it available for reuse. There is, however, a great deal of heterogeneity across the research enterprise with respect to what is meant by ‘data’ and ‘data sharing,’ why data sharing is deemed important, and what data management strategies are considered most effective. Moreover, data are often difficult and costly to produce and share. Therefore, many scholars view these as a significant product of their intellectual labor for which they should receive some sort of credit towards tenure and promotion, authorial recognition through citation, or financial compensation. While balancing all of these considerations is desirable to promote increased access to data, it is difficult to guarantee that the concerns of all research stakeholders will be met given (1) the diverse forms that data can take, as well as the mobility and malleability of data given widespread access to new information technologies, (2) the complex and variable legal status of data as not-quite/not-always property, and (3) the ethical considerations and legal restrictions implicated in the sharing and reuse of data related to sensitive topics such as personal health information, national security, and vulnerable populations. This workshop will address theoretical concerns and pragmatic solutions that can be harnessed to help researchers comply with requirements or desires to share their data in ways they deem appropriate for their goals.

Panel Topics

– Mapping the varied perspectives on why sharing research data is important and the social norms, policy pressures, ethical considerations, and legal realities facing different stakeholders (e.g., researchers, university administration, and funding bodies),

– Discussing the legal tools different parties have developed or are in the process of developing in order to increase access to data, but still ensure stakeholders interests are met (e.g., DUAs & CC-BY), and

– Addressing how these issues are further complicated when sensitive data, data requiring additional protections given the underlying subject matter (e.g., health information), are involved.

Keynotes speakers

Christine Borgman, Professor & Presidential Chair in Information Studies, UCLA

John Wilbanks, Chief Commons Officer, Sage Bionetworks

Agenda

9:00-9:30 am || Registration & Coffee

9:30-10:15 am || Morning keynote || Delivered by Christine Borgman

10:15-11:30 am || Panel 1 || Perspectives on Data Sharing Across the Research Enterprise

  • Ellen Auriti, Senior Counsel, Office of General Counsel, UC Office of the President
  • Christine Borgman, Professor & Presidential Chair in Information Studies, UCLA
  • Dav Clark, Data Scientist @ D-Lab & Fellow at Berkeley Institute for Data Science, UC Berkeley
  • Jonathan Eisen, Professor in Genomics, UC Davis
  • Carl Stahmer, Director of Digital Scholarship, Library, UC Davis
  • Alexandra Lippman, Postdoctoral Fellow, ICIS, UC Davis (moderator)

11:30-11:45 am || Coffee Break

11:45-1:00 pm || Panel 2 || Legal Tools for Data Sharing

1:00-2:15 pm || Lunch

2:30-3:15 pm || Afternoon keynote || Delivered by John Wilbanks

3:15-4:30 pm || Panel 3 || Sharing Sensitive Data Subject to Additional Legal & Ethical Considerations

4:30-5:00 pm || Closing discussion

 

Please contact Allison Fish (aefish@ucdavis.edu) to express interest in attending.

 

U.S. Department of Energy Launches PAGES

August 5th, 2014 by Robert Heyer-Gray

 

Image credit:  Sergey Sus.  License:  CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.  From Flickr:  https://flic.kr/p/96iTMv

Image credit: Sergey Sus. License: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.
https://flic.kr/p/96iTMv

 

On August 4, 2014, the US Department of Energy (DOE) unveiled its plan to increase access to the research that it funds, as required by the White House OSTP directive of February 22, 2013.

Now available is a beta version of the Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (PAGES).  The DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information website provides links to the full plan, FAQs, as well as this short summary:

” In response to the OSTP directive, OSTI has developed and launched the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and ScienceBeta – DOE PAGESBeta.  When fully operational, this new resource will offer free access to the best available full-text version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications – either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published article – after an administrative interval of 12 months. ”

According to Nature News Blog (August 4, 2014), the PAGES approach will make up to 30,000 papers per year “free to read”, but open access advocates are concerned that the approach may not provide for bulk downloading, re-distribution or creative re-use, such as text-mining.

More description of the PAGES approach from the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information website:

” The portal that OSTI has prepared employs a hybrid model of centralized metadata and primarily decentralized full-text access to accepted manuscripts or articles hosted by DOE-funded national laboratories, universities, and other institutions or by individual publishers.  In this way, the gateway builds on DOE’s existing scientific and technical information infrastructure and also integrates publishers’ public access efforts.  For publisher-hosted content, OSTI has been collaborating with the publisher consortium CHORUS, or the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States.  OSTI is also engaging with other stakeholders’ initiatives to advance public access, such as the university and research library community’s Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE). ”

For more information:

ScienceInsider Blog

The Chronicle of Higher Education

Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE)

Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS)

Nature News: Online lab notebooks

March 27th, 2014 by Cory Craig

Nature News:

A discussion of online lab notebooks featuring three of our UC colleagues (Carl Boettiger, UCSC, Carly Strasser, CDL, Karthik Rahm, UCB):

Jump off the page: 
Researchers are learning to embrace online lab notebooks, but not without growing pains
Nature 507, 523-525 (2014) doi:10.1038/nj7493-523a

 

 

New guide to Open Access

March 18th, 2013 by

Lately, it seems like Open Access (OA) has been in the news a lot:

Want to find out more about Open Access? What does it mean?  Why do we care about it?  What support exists for authors who want to publish OA?

UC Davis Librarians have created a new topic guide to help answer some of your questions about Open Access: http://ucdavis.libguides.com/open_access

Questions or Comments?

Contact:   Amy Studer  |   astuder@lib.ucdavis.edu   |   (530) 752-1678

Publish open access articles in RSC journals at no charge

January 24th, 2013 by Cory Craig

Publishing in an RSC journal? Maximize Readership With Gold Open Access

    The UC Davis Library is partnering with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) to support free Gold Open Access publishing under the RSC’s Gold for Gold initiative.
    This program offers a limited number of voucher codes that enable UC Davis researchers to publish their paper in Royal Society of Chemistry journals free of charge, as a Gold Open Access (OA) article, without paying the normal article publication fee (between £1000 and £2500).

Benefits of Gold OA publishing

    Gold Open Access publishing makes electronic versions of papers accessible to readers for free – without any subscriptions or fees.
    Removing paywall barriers may increase the visibility of research findings since works are easier to disseminate, easier to find, and easier to read. Further details about RSC journals and Open Access are available here.

You are eligible if

    You are currently affiliated with UC Davis (faculty, student, staff) and
    Your article is new and has been accepted for publication by RSC (i.e., vouchers cannot be used for articles that have already been published) and
    You have not previously received a Gold for Gold voucher from the UC Davis Library

Get your voucher code

    After your article has been accepted for publication by an RSC journal, please complete the form at http://goo.gl/rRjNJ to request your Gold for Gold voucher code. It will be emailed to you once your eligibility has been verified.
    Once you have your voucher code, complete the online RSC Gold for Gold Application form to make your article open access
    Due to limited numbers, the Library will distribute the voucher codes on a first-come-first-served basis.

Fine print

    Voucher codes are provided only after your article has been accepted for publication
    Voucher codes must be used before December 31, 2013

Questions?

    Please contact Mary Wood, Reference Librarian: mwwood@ucdavis.edu
    or Cory Craig, Chemistry Librarian: cjcraig@ucdavis.edu

NIH Public Access Policy: Jan. 15, 2013 Webinar for Compliance Officials

January 9th, 2013 by Robert Heyer-Gray

The NIH is holding a live broadcast “to assist grantee institutions with guidance and resources related to the NIH Public Access Policy, upcoming changes,tools, and how non-compliance will affect awards.”

Though authors and investigators are invited to attend, the webinar’s focus is compliance officials at grantee institutions.  Registration is required. The webinar will be recorded for future viewing. (NIH Notice Number: NOT-OD-13-016)

For additional information about the NIH Funding Public Access Mandate, see the UC Davis Library Research Guide on the topic.