Department Blog

Physical Sciences & Engineering Library

Data Rights and Data Wrongs workshop

November 6th, 2014 by Robert Heyer-Gray

Data Rights & Data Wrongs

REGISTRATION IS OPEN
Register here or go to

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/data-rights-data-wrongs-tickets-14079810091

Data Rights pic copy

 

Date & Time: December 10, 2014 from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Location: MPR, Student Community Center, UC Davis

Scholars are increasingly subject to pressures from funding bodies, disciplinary norms, professional and personal ethics, and institutional directives to share their research data and make it available for reuse. There is, however, a great deal of heterogeneity across the research enterprise with respect to what is meant by ‘data’ and ‘data sharing,’ why data sharing is deemed important, and what data management strategies are considered most effective. Moreover, data are often difficult and costly to produce and share. Therefore, many scholars view these as a significant product of their intellectual labor for which they should receive some sort of credit towards tenure and promotion, authorial recognition through citation, or financial compensation. While balancing all of these considerations is desirable to promote increased access to data, it is difficult to guarantee that the concerns of all research stakeholders will be met given (1) the diverse forms that data can take, as well as the mobility and malleability of data given widespread access to new information technologies, (2) the complex and variable legal status of data as not-quite/not-always property, and (3) the ethical considerations and legal restrictions implicated in the sharing and reuse of data related to sensitive topics such as personal health information, national security, and vulnerable populations. This workshop will address theoretical concerns and pragmatic solutions that can be harnessed to help researchers comply with requirements or desires to share their data in ways they deem appropriate for their goals.

Panel Topics

– Mapping the varied perspectives on why sharing research data is important and the social norms, policy pressures, ethical considerations, and legal realities facing different stakeholders (e.g., researchers, university administration, and funding bodies),

– Discussing the legal tools different parties have developed or are in the process of developing in order to increase access to data, but still ensure stakeholders interests are met (e.g., DUAs & CC-BY), and

– Addressing how these issues are further complicated when sensitive data, data requiring additional protections given the underlying subject matter (e.g., health information), are involved.

Keynotes speakers

Christine Borgman, Professor & Presidential Chair in Information Studies, UCLA

John Wilbanks, Chief Commons Officer, Sage Bionetworks

Agenda

9:00-9:30 am || Registration & Coffee

9:30-10:15 am || Morning keynote || Delivered by Christine Borgman

10:15-11:30 am || Panel 1 || Perspectives on Data Sharing Across the Research Enterprise

  • Ellen Auriti, Senior Counsel, Office of General Counsel, UC Office of the President
  • Christine Borgman, Professor & Presidential Chair in Information Studies, UCLA
  • Dav Clark, Data Scientist @ D-Lab & Fellow at Berkeley Institute for Data Science, UC Berkeley
  • Jonathan Eisen, Professor in Genomics, UC Davis
  • Carl Stahmer, Director of Digital Scholarship, Library, UC Davis
  • Alexandra Lippman, Postdoctoral Fellow, ICIS, UC Davis (moderator)

11:30-11:45 am || Coffee Break

11:45-1:00 pm || Panel 2 || Legal Tools for Data Sharing

1:00-2:15 pm || Lunch

2:30-3:15 pm || Afternoon keynote || Delivered by John Wilbanks

3:15-4:30 pm || Panel 3 || Sharing Sensitive Data Subject to Additional Legal & Ethical Considerations

4:30-5:00 pm || Closing discussion

 

Please contact Allison Fish (aefish@ucdavis.edu) to express interest in attending.

 

U.S. Department of Energy Launches PAGES

August 5th, 2014 by Robert Heyer-Gray

 

Image credit:  Sergey Sus.  License:  CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.  From Flickr:  https://flic.kr/p/96iTMv

Image credit: Sergey Sus. License: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.
https://flic.kr/p/96iTMv

 

On August 4, 2014, the US Department of Energy (DOE) unveiled its plan to increase access to the research that it funds, as required by the White House OSTP directive of February 22, 2013.

Now available is a beta version of the Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (PAGES).  The DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information website provides links to the full plan, FAQs, as well as this short summary:

” In response to the OSTP directive, OSTI has developed and launched the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and ScienceBeta – DOE PAGESBeta.  When fully operational, this new resource will offer free access to the best available full-text version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications – either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published article – after an administrative interval of 12 months. ”

According to Nature News Blog (August 4, 2014), the PAGES approach will make up to 30,000 papers per year “free to read”, but open access advocates are concerned that the approach may not provide for bulk downloading, re-distribution or creative re-use, such as text-mining.

More description of the PAGES approach from the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information website:

” The portal that OSTI has prepared employs a hybrid model of centralized metadata and primarily decentralized full-text access to accepted manuscripts or articles hosted by DOE-funded national laboratories, universities, and other institutions or by individual publishers.  In this way, the gateway builds on DOE’s existing scientific and technical information infrastructure and also integrates publishers’ public access efforts.  For publisher-hosted content, OSTI has been collaborating with the publisher consortium CHORUS, or the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States.  OSTI is also engaging with other stakeholders’ initiatives to advance public access, such as the university and research library community’s Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE). ”

For more information:

ScienceInsider Blog

The Chronicle of Higher Education

Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE)

Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS)

Nature News: Online lab notebooks

March 27th, 2014 by Cory Craig

Nature News:

A discussion of online lab notebooks featuring three of our UC colleagues (Carl Boettiger, UCSC, Carly Strasser, CDL, Karthik Rahm, UCB):

Jump off the page: 
Researchers are learning to embrace online lab notebooks, but not without growing pains
Nature 507, 523-525 (2014) doi:10.1038/nj7493-523a

 

 

Altmetrics Webinar: Telling a fuller story of research impact with altmetrics and ImpactStory

February 8th, 2013 by Cory Craig

A webinar presented by the American Chemical Society, Division of Chemical Information

    Date: February 20, 2013
    Time: 8 am Pacific Time (11 am Eastern time)

In growing numbers, the workflows of scholars are moving online. As that happens, important parts of the scientific process, once hidden, are being exposed. Conversations, arguments, recommendations, reads, bookmarks–the stuff of day-to-day science–is leaving traces in places like Mendeley, Twitter, blogs, Faculty of 1000, and many others.

Mining these traces can give us faster, more diverse, and more accurate data of scholarly impact. These alternative metrics or “altmetrics” could predict later citations, reveal impacts on diverse audiences like practitioners and clinicians, uncover impacts of diverse products like datasets, blog posts, and software, and reward researchers making subtle but vital contributions that the citation record ignores.

After reviewing the growing research around altmetrics, we’ll discuss how these data sources can be of practical use for researchers and publishers today, focusing on ImpactStory, open-source web tool that gathers and contextualizes altmetrics.

Connection Details:
https://acspubs2.adobeconnect.com/cinfwebinar-feb2013 select “Guest” and enter your name.
The session will be open by 7:45 am (10:45 am Eastern time). Please try the link at any time, though, to ensure your browser compatibility.

For more info see: http://www.acscinf.org/about/news/20130131.php

ACM moves towards offering OA options

February 6th, 2013 by

The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), which is the preeminent computer science professional society and publisher, announced this week that they are going to begin offering alternatives for authors who want to make their ACM-accepted articles open access in the ACM Digital Library. Under the current publishing copyright agreement, authors transfer copyright and distribution rights to the ACM, but are able to post author-prepared copies of their articles to their personal websites. In future the ACM will also have two publishing agreement alternatives: a more detailed publishing agreement for those who want to retain copyright, and an author-pays open access model, where the author will pay a fee for publication and their article in the DL will be free to everyone (the fee has not yet been set).

The ACM also noted changes for SIGs who produce conference proceedings; they can now choose to make their proceedings OA around the time of the conference or for the most recent conference. Full details for all of the new choices, which are still under development by the ACM, are in an editorial in this month’s CACM.

It’s worth noting that under the current publishing agreement, in addition to posting pre-publication copies on their own websites authors also have the right to deposit pre-publication copies of their articles in an institutional repository. The UC’s eScholarship repository is available for any UC Davis authors who wish to do so.  The ACM also maintains the “Author-izer” service, which enables authors who register to acquire unique links for their papers in the DL, which authors can then use on their personal webpages to allow anyone to download the definitive DL version of the paper for free.

For help or questions regarding eScholarship, Author-izer, the ACM Digital Library, or copyright and publication, contact Phoebe Ayers, CS Librarian: psayers@ucdavis.edu

Publish open access articles in RSC journals at no charge

January 24th, 2013 by Cory Craig

Publishing in an RSC journal? Maximize Readership With Gold Open Access

    The UC Davis Library is partnering with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) to support free Gold Open Access publishing under the RSC’s Gold for Gold initiative.
    This program offers a limited number of voucher codes that enable UC Davis researchers to publish their paper in Royal Society of Chemistry journals free of charge, as a Gold Open Access (OA) article, without paying the normal article publication fee (between £1000 and £2500).

Benefits of Gold OA publishing

    Gold Open Access publishing makes electronic versions of papers accessible to readers for free – without any subscriptions or fees.
    Removing paywall barriers may increase the visibility of research findings since works are easier to disseminate, easier to find, and easier to read. Further details about RSC journals and Open Access are available here.

You are eligible if

    You are currently affiliated with UC Davis (faculty, student, staff) and
    Your article is new and has been accepted for publication by RSC (i.e., vouchers cannot be used for articles that have already been published) and
    You have not previously received a Gold for Gold voucher from the UC Davis Library

Get your voucher code

    After your article has been accepted for publication by an RSC journal, please complete the form at http://goo.gl/rRjNJ to request your Gold for Gold voucher code. It will be emailed to you once your eligibility has been verified.
    Once you have your voucher code, complete the online RSC Gold for Gold Application form to make your article open access
    Due to limited numbers, the Library will distribute the voucher codes on a first-come-first-served basis.

Fine print

    Voucher codes are provided only after your article has been accepted for publication
    Voucher codes must be used before December 31, 2013

Questions?

    Please contact Mary Wood, Reference Librarian: mwwood@ucdavis.edu
    or Cory Craig, Chemistry Librarian: cjcraig@ucdavis.edu

NIH Public Access Policy: Jan. 15, 2013 Webinar for Compliance Officials

January 9th, 2013 by Robert Heyer-Gray

The NIH is holding a live broadcast “to assist grantee institutions with guidance and resources related to the NIH Public Access Policy, upcoming changes,tools, and how non-compliance will affect awards.”

Though authors and investigators are invited to attend, the webinar’s focus is compliance officials at grantee institutions.  Registration is required. The webinar will be recorded for future viewing. (NIH Notice Number: NOT-OD-13-016)

For additional information about the NIH Funding Public Access Mandate, see the UC Davis Library Research Guide on the topic.

Open Access and Scholarly Publishing Explained (PhD Comics)

October 29th, 2012 by Cory Craig

Open Access and Scholarly Publishing Explained
8.5 minute video from PhD Comics: PhD Comics: What is Open Access? (on YouTube).

Narration by Nick Shockey (SPARC) and Jonathan Eisen (UC Davis). Animation by Jorge Cham.

NEW – Open Access Fund Pilot

October 26th, 2012 by

The UC Davis Open Access Fund pilot (UCD-OAF) supports
Academic Senate, Academic Federation members, faculty, post-docs, residents, fellows, and graduate students
who want to make their journal articles free to all readers immediately upon publication.

UCD-OAF provides Davis authors reimbursement up to $1000/article for open access fees for those publishing in full open access journals  (journals in which all articles are published open access).

The fund is intended to subsidize reasonable open access publishing charges for researchers when funds are otherwise unavailable.  Eligible charges include article processing fees for fully open access journals.

The California Digital Library and UC Davis University Library are providing the funds in order to support UCD authors interested in reshaping models of scholarly publishing.  The University Library will track how the funds are spent, and the success and sustainability of the pilot will be evaluated.  The chief goals of the program include fostering greater dissemination of the work of University of California, Davis scholars and encouraging author control of copyright.

additional information and application:

www.lib.ucdavis.edu/ul/about/ucdoaf/index.php

ucdavis.libguides.com/openaccess

New data management plan tool available

November 22nd, 2011 by

The University of California Curation Center (UC3) at the California Digital Library has produced a template tool for those who need to create data management plans (DMPs) for grant submissions. Starting this year, the NSF has joined other agencies in requiring that a data management plan be submitted with every new grant application; find out more about data management plans, including links to lists of agencies requiring them and lists of data repositories, on the library webpage about DMPs.

The DMP tool is available here: https://dmp.cdlib.org/

To get started, simply select “University of California, Davis” as your campus and create a new login. The DMPTool supports data management plans and funder requirements across the disciplines, including the humanities and physical, medical, and social sciences, and includes multiple agency requirements.

The DMPTool is open-source, freely available, and easily configurable to reflect an institution’s local policies and information. Users of the DMPTool can view sample plans, preview funder requirements, and view the latest changes to their plans. It permits the user to create an editable document for submission to a funding agency, and can accommodate different versions as funding requirements change.

If you have any questions about using the DMPtool, or any other aspect of data management, contact your subject liaison librarian or one of the librarians listed here.