Department Blog

Scholarly Communication

Where Libraries Go From Here

June 14th, 2016 by Mary Wood

New%20Librarianship%20Field%20GuideQ&A with author of book on how librarians can better serve higher education

Inside HigherEd
June 8, 2016
Carl Straumsheim interviews author R. David Lankes

“New book explores how academic libraries can shape their services to better serve higher education — and what librarians should do to make it happen.

Q: You present five ideas for how libraries can “proactively speed the scholarly conversation”…

A: There are some great examples where academic libraries are becoming true publishers of the whole universities. The clearest example is the large number of academic presses that have been folded into or governed by academic libraries. However, this is only part of the story. Academic libraries are expanding decades of work digitizing resources and providing institutional repositories…”

Investigating sustainable model of OA APC

April 1st, 2015 by Mary Wood

Pay It Forward: Investigating a Sustainable Model of Open Access Article Processing Charges
for Large North American Research Institutions

.Mellon SC

UC Davis, CDL to Lead Major Project to Build Open Access Financial Model

The University of California, Davis and the California Digital Library (CDL) will lead a major new project, with an $800,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to help define the future of Open Access to scholarship.

Pay It Forward: Investigating a Sustainable Model of Open Access Article Processing Charges for Large North American Research Institutions is a year-long effort to study the implications of new funding models for scholarly communications, particularly the use of article processing charges, and determine their sustainability for research universities in the U.S. and Canada.The project partnership includes three major research libraries (Harvard University, Ohio State University and the University of British Columbia) as well as the ten University of California campuses.

The project will create a detailed, flexible, and publicly available financial model to help university administrators and librarians develop Open Access policies and strategies.

ICIS Innovating Communication in Scholarship
UC Davis and CDL Investigation of the Institutional Costs of Gold Open Access

Seeking New Paths to Open Access in the Humanities

March 6th, 2014 by Amy Studer

By David Michalski

Earlier this week, I attended webinar, called “Open Access in the Humanities” led by Rupert Gatti. Dr. Gatti is a Fellow in Economics at Trinity College, Cambridge and Co-Founder and Director of Open Book Publishers. The presentation outlined the landscape and the challenges of Open Access in the humanities.

One point that resonated with me, given the centrality of monographs to the humanities, was a statistic that showed the relative dearth of new open access academic books in relation to new journal titles. Clearly there are combinations of reasons preventing a more robust move to open access in the humanities, both economic (the problem of financial capital: books (e or print) are more labor intensive) and sociocultural (the problem of cultural capital: in that humanities books are awarded status and prestige through publishing houses). Gatti’s presentation took on these challenges by seeking a sustainable ways to address these conditions, showing some exciting options moving forward.

The bulk of his presentation was spent on Open Books Publishers, a new publishing project for peer-reviewed open access monographs, which he directs. (See Open Books Publishers:

http://www.openbookpublishers.com/section/25/1/faqs ) This outfit has only published a few books to date, but their economic model, which includes a mixture of revenue from big name supporters, hard-copy and alternative format sales, and voluntary author-generated publication grant funding makes them an interesting new player in field.

Gatti also outlined other important initiatives. One of these was Knowledge Unlatched, (See: http://www.knowledgeunlatched.org/ ) a project which seeks long-term cost savings for institutions by sharing the costs of making HSS monographs available on a Creative Commons license. UC Libraries is part in one of their pilot projects. Another was Unglue It, ( https://unglue.it/about/) a project designed to help individuals and institutions join together to liberate specific ebooks “crowd-funding ” payments to authors and publishers so they they will relicense their works under Creative Commons licenses.”

It is exciting to see these different economic models being tried. While I can’t say they will all achieve the sustainability they desire, it is clear that their aim is to create cooperatives to address real costs.

This webinar was sponsored by UKSG, a group formally that United Kingdom Serials Group. UKSG has evolved into a network that encourages “the exchange of ideas on scholarly communication…spanning the wide range of interests and activities across the scholarly information community of librarians, publishers, intermediaries and technology vendors. More about their activities can be found here: http://www.uksg.org/