Department Blog

Special Collections

On This Day: March 4, 1972

March 4th, 2015 by Sara Gunasekara

Today’s feature in our On This Day series takes us back to the March 4, 1972 dedication of Roessler Hall. Edward B. Roessler (1902-1993) taught on the Davis campus from 1933 until his retirement in 1970. In addition to holding a Professorship in Mathematics, he served as Chairman of the Department of Mathematics and Physics, Chairman of the Department of Mathematics, and Acting Dean of the College of Letters and Science. He also served as Dean of University Extension.

Roessler Hall houses two lecture halls and classrooms which are predominantly used by the Physics Department.

roessler

Second group of audiovisual materials digitized by the CAVPP

March 4th, 2015 by Sara Gunasekara

We’re excited to announce that the second group of audiovisual materials that were digitized through our participation in the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP) are now available online.

Fourteen titles were digitized from the following collections: Audiovisual CollectionEastman’s Originals Collection, Henry Dart Greene Papers, Max Kleiber Papers, and T. Elliot Weier Papers. The digitized items feature campus activities, including two dedications (the 1973 dedication of the Library to Peter J. Shields and the 1972 dedication of the Jerome C. Davis homestead plaque), as well as clips from the 1965 Wild West Days event. Scenes of two 1941 UC Davis football games are included in a film by T. Elliot Weier. Other titles feature Northern California locations including Shasta, Lassen, and Tehama Counties. Early fruit packing activities can be viewed in a film by Henry Dart Greene. Several speeches by Professor Max Kleiber were also digitized.

We’ve listed the fourteen digitized items below. You can view all of our items that have been digitized through the CAVPP on the Internet Archive here.

In September we nominated items for a third round of digitization. We’ll make another announcement when those items are available online.

 

Remarks at Dedication of Jerome C. Davis Homestead Plaque, University of California, Davis. (Audiovisual Collection)

Shields Library Dedication, UC Davis (Audiovisual Collection)

Wild West Days at UC Davis (Audiovisual Collection)

Lassen and Modoc Counties, Calif.  (Eastman’s Original Collection)

Shasta County, Calif. and Lake County, Oregon (Eastman’s Originals Collection)

Tehama County, Calif. Scenes (Eastman’s Originals Collection)

Packing fruit in California and Other Scenes (Henry Dart Greene Papers)

Last Lecture: What You Should Take With You From Your University (Max Kleiber Papers)

Food and Population, speech at Farm and Home Conference, UC Davis (Max Kleiber Papers)

Agnews Meadow (T. Elliot Weier Papers)

Lassen Volcanic National Park, Calif. (T. Elliot Weier Papers)

Sonora Pass, Calif. and Other California Scenes (T. Elliot Weier Papers)

Spring collecting trip east of the Sierras (T. Elliot Weier Papers)

T. Elliot Weier and Family Activities (T. Elliot Weier Papers)

Still frame from Tehama County, Calif. Scenes film.

Still frame from Tehama County, Calif. Scenes film.

The Classroom in Special Collections

March 3rd, 2015 by Jenny Hodge

Special Collections prepared a “History of the Book” table exhibit for Prof. Jane Beal’s University Writing Program 101 course.  The students were then asked to answer the following question: What were three of the most memorable and meaningful books that you saw in the “History of the Book” table exhibit in the Special Collections of Shields Library? The blog posts in the “Classroom in Special Collections” series will display their answers (permission granted by students mentioned below).

MV Blog
The Special Collections Room in Shield’s Library is full of many treasures. The ones that jumped out at me the most would have to be Shakespeare’s 2nd Folio, the French Illustrated Encyclopedia, and the facsimile of the 14th Century Italian Music Manuscript. The 2nd Folio of Shakespeare was an amazing thing to see. I have spent many years reading, studying, and seeing the works of Shakespeare, so it was amazing to see them in such a manner. It is amazing to me that this Folio was created with such care and finesse so that it may be enjoyed throughout the ages. Even the quote written on one of the first few pages had me in awe. The French Illustrated Encyclopedia was another amazing sight. I applaud the author, whose name I can’t seem to recall, who saw the need for such a book to exist. The sheer amount of work that must have gone into gathering what seems to be the summation of all the technological advancements and common knowledge of time is astounding to me. The fact that the book is in such a great condition is another blessing in disguise. Perhaps my favorite piece, however, would be the Facsimile of the 14th Century Italian Music Manuscript. I have always been a great fan of music, and am appreciative of everything from Gregorian Chant to Modern Classical. It is a great thing to be able to see such a work from a country that is well known to be a center of many of the great works that the world appreciates today. The facsimile captured the colors and richness of the pages beautifully. The artistry that went into making this manuscript must have taken countless hours. Each page was adorned with a vast array of colors and images that brought life to the lines of music. Our short tour of the Special Collections room was quite the treat, and I am happy to have had this opportunity to peruse such valuable works.

-Maheep Virk

Works Mentioned:

1. Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. Published according to the true Originall copies. Oversize PR2751 .A2

2. Encyclopedie, ou Dictionnaire raisonne des sciences, des arts et des metiers Oversize AE25 .E5 

3. Il codice Squarcialupi : Ms. Mediceo Palatino 87, Biblioteca medicea laurenziana di Firenze. Oversize ML96.4 .S68

KW blog
After visiting the Special Collections exhibit at the Shield Library, I was astounded by the variety of books that our school had that were priceless due to their rarity and the educational value each book held. The very first book that I took notice of was in fact not quite a book. Upon viewing the Sumerian clay tablet, I was intrigued that something so old was in my presence. As a history fanatic, I was instantly enamored by the idea that thousands of years ago, that tablet was used by an ancient civilization in order to complete a daily task. The impressions were no longer clear on the tablet, worn down by time, a quality that only drew me to the piece more. After viewing various tables filled with priceless books, I once again was captivated by Shakespeare’s 2nd Folio. All throughout my educational experience, Shakespeare was taught in various forms: his life, his plays, and his era. Once again, the historically inclined side of me could only fathom the importance of having a hard copy of Shakespeare’s works in print and at the tip of my finger. The opportunity to study Shakespeare and even know his plays to this day was in part due to the effort of the Folio makers and their dedication to assemble his various works. The last piece that drew my attention was the Sierra Journals by Gary Snyder. Initially, I did not expect much from the book, since it was one of the more recent books made. I soon discovered that the book was not valued due to its timeless nature, much like the others, but its sheer beauty. The pictures were detailed and breathtaking, leaving me to stare at their pages for minutes on end without having the desire to move on. Going to the Special Collections allowed me to discover how amazing books can be, whether ancient or more recent, in all different forms, and in various languages.

-Katrina West

4. Sumerian clay tablet. PJ4071 .S9

5. Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. Published according to the true Originall copies. Oversize PR2751 .A2

6. The High Sierra of California / Tom Killion ; with excerpts from the Sierra journals of Gary Snyder and John Muir. Oversize PS3569.N88 H54 2000

The Classroom in Special Collections

March 3rd, 2015 by Jenny Hodge

Special Collections prepared a “History of the Book” table exhibit for Prof. Jane Beal’s University Writing Program 101 course.  The students were then asked to answer the following question: What were three of the most memorable and meaningful books that you saw in the “History of the Book” table exhibit in the Special Collections of Shields Library? The blog posts in the “Classroom in Special Collections” series will display their answers (permission granted by students mentioned below).

GM Blog
Getting a chance to view the “History of the Book” exhibit at the Special Collections of Shields Library was an enlightening experience that showed me a side of history that I had not been exposed to in the past. Out of all the book works displayed, the three that stood out the most to me were the many editions of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Isaac Newton’s Principia Mathematica, and Shakespeare Second Folio. I have always had an interested in the history of the Civil War. Taking a look at all the different editions of the book that “sparked” the conflict between the North and the South puts things in perspective. It is an incredible to think that such a small written text could have had such an influence in the course this country took in the past. Similarly, the book written by Isaac Newton all those year ago also had an affect on the way we see the world. Seeing the inspiration that brought forth so many new ideas and perspectives is truly inspiring. Being a science major myself, I am especially drawn to anything that had has to do with the history of modern science. Lastly, Shakespeare second folio is a really amazing piece of work to be able to appreciate. Learning that the folio was not written by Shakespeare but instead by someone who gathered all his works together was really an interesting fact. This information adds to the mystery of Shakespeare persona that I wish someone had been able to capture while he was alive. History has always been a subject of interest of mine. Getting a chance to see all the amazing pieces of history was an incredible experience. It gives me a further appreciation for what historians do in order to preserve this history for future generations.

-Gerardo A. Montoya

Works Mentioned:

1. Uncle Tom’s cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe; with 27 illustrations on wood by George Cruikshank. PS2954 .U5 1852d

2. Philosophiæ naturalis principia mathematica. QA803 .A2 1726

3. Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. Published according to the true Originall copies. Oversize PR2751 .A2

AS Blog
The trip to the Special Collections sections of the library was unique from a literary perspective, but it was also anthropologically intriguing. I am fascinated by the act of connecting a piece of tangible history (in this case– books) with a person, event, or time period. I was intrigued by the Sumerian Clay Tablet as it was one of the first written accounts in history. I also enjoyed flipping through the pages of the Illustrated Encyclopedia. It was essentially the equivalent of a modern-day instruction manual for hundreds of different architectural/design pieces. Finally, I found the Wine Cork Book to be especially interesting. It exemplifies the artistic evolution of book-making– from decorating the calligraphy of bibles with gold to using a cork as a creative literary medium. Ultimately, the experience was special; few people are granted the opportunity to see and experience such rare literary artifacts.

-Andrew Suliteanu

4. Sumerian clay tablet. PJ4071 .S9

5. Encyclopedie, ou Dictionnaire raisonne des sciences, des arts et des metiers Oversize AE25 .E5 

6. The wine / illustrated and bound by Suzanne Thomas. TP548.7 .T46 2008

Panama-Pacific International Exposition Photographs now online

March 3rd, 2015 by Sara Gunasekara

We’re pleased to announce that the images from our Panama-Pacific International Exposition Photograph Collection are now online. This collection was processed by Photograph Archivist Patsy Inouye before her retirement.

The collection contains photographic glass negatives of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition (PPIE) taken by the Cardinell-Vincent Company, the official photographers of the Exposition. The PPIE was a world’s fair, held in 1915 in San Francisco, to celebrate the opening of the Panama Canal. The fair featured commercial, scientific, and educational displays in exhibition palaces and courts, amusement concessions, and an aviation field. Nearly nineteen million people attended the fair which was held on 635 acres in the area now known as the Marina District.

The photographs show examples of the exhibits, as well as images of entertainers and contest winners. One photograph (No. 15493 seen below) features Henry Ford and Thomas Edison looking at an Edison Telegraph. You can view all of the photographs online here.

We’re highlighting images from this collection as part of our blog series, Panama-Pacific International Exposition (PPIE) centennial. The PPIE100 website has information regarding the celebratory events that are being held in San Francisco for the PPIE centennial.

Thomas Edison and Henry Ford at Western Union exhibit. Liberal Arts Palace,  Panama Pacific International Exposition, 1915.

Thomas Edison and Henry Ford at Western Union exhibit. Liberal Arts Palace, Panama Pacific International Exposition, 1915.

 

Ellen Schutt Pomological Watercolors now online

March 3rd, 2015 by Sara Gunasekara

We’re excited to announce that the Ellen Schutt Pomological Watercolors are now online. Ellen Isham Schutt (1873-1955) was an illustrator with the United States Department of Agriculture who was active from 1904-1914. This collection contains 286 original watercolors of fruits, mostly apples, rendered by Schutt for the University of California. The watercolors illustrate examples of a variety of conditions including cold storage, core rot, injury damage, and moth damage, among others. The apples are usually shown in two views: a full view and a half section. The watercolors are available online here.

 Box 1:53 No. 190 Smith's Cider, Inyo, California, 1915 March.

No. 190 Smith’s Cider, Inyo, California, 1915 March.

Travel Tuesday: O’Brien

March 3rd, 2015 by Sara Gunasekara

This week’s feature in our Travel Tuesday series takes us to O’Brien, California. The images below are from our Eastman Originals Collection.

Duncan's Lodge, O'Brien, Calif., 1958.

Duncan’s Lodge, O’Brien, Calif., 1958.

O'Brien Lodge, O'Brien, Calif., 1958.

O’Brien Lodge, O’Brien, Calif., 1958.

The Classroom in Special Collections

March 2nd, 2015 by Jenny Hodge

Special Collections prepared a “History of the Book” table exhibit for Prof. Jane Beal’s University Writing Program 101 course.  The students were then asked to answer the following question: What were three of the most memorable and meaningful books that you saw in the “History of the Book” table exhibit in the Special Collections of Shields Library? The blog posts in the “Classroom in Special Collections” series will display their answers (permission granted by students mentioned below).

KK Blog
Last week, looking at the “History of Books” exhibit at the Library, I experienced art in a whole new way. There were many books, but 3 resonated most with me. The Sumerian Clay Tablet, the Book of Hours, and the 14th Century Italian Music Manuscript all spoke to my heart. The amount of craftsmanship and love that was put into writing captivated me. Back then there was more appreciation in the written word. In order to write, one would have to be apart of the process. In the Clay Tablet, one would need to form the clay and carve out the writings. In the Book of Hours, monks would spend hours decorating and artfully writing down prayers. Today books are soullessly mass-produced, and as such, are treated with little respect. The 14th Century Italian Music Manuscript was a reproduction but still was treated with respect from the maker. Each page of the Manuscript was embellished beautifully. Today everyone can read, write, and has access to paper. The beauty is lost because many who write do not do so with love for the art. Books and art go hand in hand, because books are just written artworks.

-Kristina Khuu

Works Mentioned:

1. Sumerian clay tablet. PJ4071 .S9

2. Hours of the Virgin, in Latin, preceded by a Calendar in French,... BX2080 .A2 1497

3. Il codice Squarcialupi : Ms. Mediceo Palatino 87, Biblioteca medicea laurenziana di Firenze. Oversize ML96.4 .S68

CM Blog
The three books that were meaningful and memorable books that I saw in the “History of the Book” table exhibit in the Special Collections of Shield Library are Sumerian clay tablet, Shakespeare’s 2nd folio, and [The High Sierra of California] fine pages and Japanese-like illustration. Firstly I saw the Sumerian clay tablet, I was so surprised because I was expected how the oldest book was. However, it was totally different from my expectation. The reason why this book is meaningful to me is because as this book is the oldest book in history, and so this book has been known and seen all the history event more than people did. The book did not have any emotions; however, it might feel historical event the most closest. Secondly, Shakespeare’s 2nd folio reminded me to tell my mother because my mother is a big fan of Shakespeare. When I was young, she kept telling me the story of Shakespeare and so I feel close to his book while I grow up. In fact, after I went to this exhibit in the Special Collections, I called to my mother and told her about Shakespeare’s 2nd folio and then she wished to see it in her eyes. Thus, this Shakespeare’s 2nd folio is related with my childhood memory so it is one of my memorable books. Last, this is my favorite in the Special Collection: fine pages and Japanese-like illustration. Inside of the fine pages and Japanese-like illustration, they have used Japanese traditional tissue papers. Those papers recalled my grandmother because until she passed away, she was collected those kind of papers and sometimes showed me. When I saw it in the exhibit, suddenly her smile came up in my mind. Plus, I do have same kind of tissue paper in my home; however, the book’s paper was so sensitive, gorgeous, and beautiful. That is totally represent of Japanese nationality. Overall because of those reasons, three books are my meaningful books and I am surely so happy to see and get knowledge of history from books.

-Chiaki Miura

4. Sumerian clay tablet. PJ4071 .S9

5. Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. Published according to the true Originall copies. Oversize PR2751 .A2

6. The High Sierra of California / Tom Killion ; with excerpts from the Sierra journals of Gary Snyder and John Muir. Oversize PS3569.N88 H54 2000

The Classroom in Special Collections

March 2nd, 2015 by Jenny Hodge

Special Collections prepared a “History of the Book” table exhibit for Prof. Jane Beal’s University Writing Program 101 course.  The students were then asked to answer the following question: What were three of the most memorable and meaningful books that you saw in the “History of the Book” table exhibit in the Special Collections of Shields Library? The blog posts in the “Classroom in Special Collections” series will display their answers (permission granted by students mentioned below).

HGBlog

The three most significant works that I saw in this exhibit were the Book of Kells, Speght’s 1602 edition of Chaucer’s “Complete Works,” and the 14th century Italian Music Manuscript. The first one, the Book of Kells was exciting to see in class, because I have had the chance to see it at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland. I enjoyed being able to see the copy of it in person, after seeing the original behind glass and only opened to one page.  Speght’s 1602 edition of Chaucer’s “Complete Works” was significant, because I had to read those books in high school, like many others. Reading it out of a textbook in excerpts had a much different feeling than seeing the book in semi-original form with full color renditions. The final book that interested me was the 14th century Italian Music Manuscript. This book brought back great memories for me of my time in Italy. While staying in Florence I went to the Uffizi and saw many works of art, but the way the edges of the paper were decorated reminded me of the ceiling in the hallways of the Uffizi. The same reds and greens line the ceiling in beautiful ribbon and vine designs with little figures spread throughout them. In all, these works brought back memories of my recent and more distant past and gave me tangible examples of the works that I have experienced.

-Hailie Guerrero

Works Mentioned:

1. Bible. Gospels. Latin. Book of Kells. Oversize BS2552.K3 A5

2. The vvorkes of ovr ancient and learned English poet, Geffrey Chavcer, newly printed … Oversize PR1850 1602

3. Il codice Squarcialupi : Ms. Mediceo Palatino 87, Biblioteca medicea laurenziana di Firenze. Oversize ML96.4 .S68

AH Blog
Before going in, I was unsure of my interest in old documents or books, but as we walked through the exhibit, three books really caught my attention. When I saw the Greek bible a sense of awe hit me. Seeing the construction of the leather bound book with the words written in such a foreign and ancient language on sheep skin pages, really struck me. I couldn’t believe I was looking at something that was written by someone almost 2,000 years ago right in front of me. As we moved up the tables, the next book to really catch my attention was Shakespeare’s 2nd Folio. These were the works studied in English classrooms all over the world, printed on the page from after Shakespeare’s death. The words on the page were the ones read by people hundreds of years ago, studying his work and taking it apart. The sense of awe from these two books paled in comparison to how I felt looking at the Principia Mathematica by Isaac Newton. The words and concepts in this book changed science fundamentally, but also changed how people thought about our solar system. Isaac Newton developed the mathematics to explain physical phenomena and explained how the heliocentric idea of the time was wrong; the Earth wasn’t the center of the world. Physics, science, and technology owe their existence to the concepts in this book. I thought about how some of these books were lectured about in some class through powerpoint, but here they are, sitting in front of me. After leaving the library, all I could do was think about how amazing it was to be so close to the books and history that we study in class.

-Alix Holleschau

4. The four Gospels of the New Testament. Greek. 12th cent. BS2551 .A4 no.2641

5. Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. Published according to the true Originall copies. Oversize PR2751 .A2

6. Philosophiæ naturalis principia mathematica. QA803 .A2 1726

Music Monday: Times

March 2nd, 2015 by Sara Gunasekara

This week’s Music Monday feature is Times, from the Christopher A. Reynolds Collection of Women Song.

D435_5_54