Department Blog

Special Collections

50 Features of Special Collections: The Many Faces of Davis Maps

February 22nd, 2017 by Dawn Collings

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The Map Collection include maps of the local area and California communities.  Various types of maps show different aspects and concerns which are important to the development and growth of a city or region.  The Map Collection includes street maps, zoning maps, school districts, voting precincts, census tracts, bus routes, bicycle paths, and flood zones.  Maps printed over a period of time show historical changes in city boundaries, street names, neighborhood development, park and recreation facilities, schools and city buildings, and sometimes names of buildings such as hospitals.

In the spirit of celebrations, Special Collections is also honoring the Centennial of the City of Davis.   Let’s celebrate with the panel covers of some Davis maps available in the Map Collection.

Davis + UC Davis guide + map  MAP G4364.D3 2011 .Y6

 

 

Street map of Davis                  MAP G4364.D3 2004 .T2

 

 

Davis bike map                                 MAP G4364.D3E63 2016 .U6

 

Welcome to Davis, California  MAP G4364.D3P2 2013 .D3

 

Davis Art Walk        No Call Number                     (Ask staff for help)

 

Davis, California : home of UC Davis MAP G4364.D3P2 2015 .D3

 

Map of Davis
MAP G4364.D3 1988 .C6

Map of Davis
MAP G4364.D3 1990 .C6

Map of Davis, Yolo County, California
MAP G4364.D3 1980 .C6

The Map Collection room is located on the Lower Level of Shields Library.  Doors open to the public Monday-Friday, 1:00-5:00 p.m.

Contact the Special Collections Department for map related questions by email at speccoll@ucdavis.edu or by phone at 530-752-1621.

Post created by Dawn Collings and Kristoffer Landes

50 Features of Special Collections: Early Oil Fields of Kern County, California

January 25th, 2017 by Dawn Collings

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Beginning in 1864, tar was mined in open pits for asphalt and kerosene in the Kern County region.  After the discovery of the Shamrock Gusher at the McKittrick Oil Field in 1896, oil wells began to replace tar mining as the predominant form of energy harvesting in California.

 

 

The Midway Gusher at the Midway Oil Field blew in 1909 and was followed shortly thereafter by the Lakeview Gusher on March 14th, 1910. To date, the Lakeview Gusher remains the largest gusher to have erupted in the United States and is immortalized as California Historical Landmark 485.

 

 

All of the oil fields showcased in the maps above are still in active use, although the Midway Oil Field shown here in this 1905 map is now part of the larger Midway-Sunset Oil Field. The 2015 Report of California Oil and Gas Production Statistics published by the California Department of Conservation gives detailed statistics regarding how many barrels of oil were produced by each field in 2015:

  • Kern River: 25,693,327 barrels
  • McKittrick: 3,334,448 barrels
  • Midway-Sunset: 28,184,793 barrels

Further examination of the report reveals that the Kern River and Midway-Sunset oil fields were the top two California oil fields in 2015, followed in third place by the South Belridge Oil Field, which produced 22,901,979 barrels. Together, the Kern River and Midway-Sunset oil fields accounted for approximately 26.7% of the state’s 201,711,080 barrel total, lending credence to the claim that these historic fields are still a critical part of California’s natural resource industry today.

For more information on the history of oil in Kern County please visit these websites:

http://www.sjvgeology.org/history/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kern_River_Oil_Field

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midway-Sunset_Oil_Field

 

Resources:

California Department of Conservation, 2015 Report of California Oil and Gas Production Statistics, April, 2015,  ftp://ftp.consrv.ca.gov/pub/oil/annual_reports/2015/PR03_2015.pdf. Accessed 25 Jan. 2017

California. Office of Historic Preservation. California Historical Landmarks. 11th Ed.]. ed. Sacramento: Office of Historic Preservation, Dept. of Parks and Recreation, 1990. Print.

Prutzman, Paul W. [Kern County Oil Fields]. Sacramento, CA?: State Mining Bureau, 1905. Print.  (MAP G4361.H8 1905 .C21)

Post created by Dawn Collings & Kristoffer Landes

50 Features of Special Collections: Mark Twain Bronze Sculpture

November 29th, 2016 by Daryl Morrison
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The famed author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910) better known by his nom de plume Mark Twain was born in Missouri on November 30th so it seems fitting to celebrate one of our “50 features of Special Collections” on the Mark Twain bust owned by the library.

The Mark Twain bust was created by artist Walter Bowman Russell (1871-1963) in 1935 and is located on the second floor of the library near the Main Reading Room.  The bronze bust of Mark Twain was donated by the Danel and Reboin families, owners of the Herald Printing Co. The bust plaque notes that it is a gift to the library by “Ralph and Daisy Danel, Sr., Ralph and Judee Danel, Robert and Rosemary Reboin, Stephen and Janice Danel, and the Herald Printing Company.” It was donated in 2000, along with the Sacramento Union Records held by Special Collections. The Sacramento Union was the oldest daily newspaper west of the Mississippi, until it closed its doors in 1994.

Twain is remembered for his wonderful novels but also for his contributions to the Sacramento Union.  The point was made  evident through  the large bronze bust of Twain, which sat just west of the State Capitol in the lobby of the Sacramento Union’s building at 301 Capitol Mall. Twain dispatched a series of articles on Hawaii for the Union in 1866. These were very popular, and many historians credit the series with turning Twain into a journalistic star.

Mark Twain, 1907

Inscribed on the bust were Twain’s words: “Early in 1866, George Barnes invited me to resign my reportership on his paper, the San Francisco Morning Call, and for some months thereafter, I was without money or work; then I had a pleasant turn of fortune. The proprietors of the Sacramento Union, a great and influential daily journal, sent me to the Sandwich Islands to write four letters a month at twenty dollars a piece. I was there for four or five months, and returned to find myself about the best known man on the Pacific Coast.”

The sculptor, Walter Bowman Russell (May 19, 1871 – May 19, 1963) was an American painter (of the Boston School), sculptor, natural philosopher, musician, author and builder. His lectures and writing place him firmly in the New Thought Movement. The New York Herald Tribune, called him “the modern Leonardo, a Renaissance man for the twentieth century.”

By Glenn Clark (Walter Russell - Vielfalt im Einklang)

Walter Russell

At age 56 Walter Russell turned to sculpture and fashioned portrait busts of Thomas Edison, General MacArthur, John Philip Sousa, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Charles Goodyear, and others. He rose to top rank as a sculptor. He won the commissions for the Mark Twain Memorial (1934) and for President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s The Four Freedoms (1943).

Walter Russell successfully explored music, literature, architecture, painting, sculpture, natural sciences, new ways towards a healthy economy, philosophy and mysticism as well as figure skating, horse breeding and dressage. Together with his second wife Lao, he founded a private university for distance learning, the University of Science and Philosophy in Swannanoa, Virginia. You can find a summary of Walter Russell’s life and work at http://www.walter-russell.de/en/WalterRussell.php

50 Features of Special Collections: Toby Cole Archives

November 3rd, 2016 by Sara Gunasekara
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This week we are highlighting the Toby Cole Archives as part of our 50 Features of Special Collections series.

Toby Cole was born Marion Cholodenko on January 27, 1916 in Newark, New Jersey. She developed an interest in theatre at an early age, and embarked upon her theatrical career under the auspices of The Workmen’s Circle, a Jewish socialist fraternal organization. From 1938 to 1956, she demonstrated her penchant for socially committed theatre, participating in such groups as The Newark Jack London Club, The Newark Collective Theatre, The New Theatre League School, and the Federal Theatre Project. She also served as assistant to the producer on Broadway productions of Counterattack and Finian’s Rainbow, and as producer for Children’s Holiday Theatre in New York.

Cole established an actor’s agency in 1957, operating from an office in the Sardi Building. Zero Mostel, whom she represented for many years, was her first “star.” With the founding of the Toby Cole Actors and Authors Agency, Cole added playwrights and translators to her clientele. She concentrated on playwrights whose works appealed to the Off-Broadway producers. That is, she promoted plays that she considered high quality and socially/politically relevant, thereby introducing to the U.S. such seminal playwrights as Sam Shepard, Edward Bond, and Simon Gray. She also brought to the New York stage translations of foreign plays by Brecht, Pirandello, and Witkiewicz, among others. Moreover, Cole circulated plays outside of New York and acted as agent for amateur as well as professional rights.

Cole passed away on May 22, 2008.

The Toby Cole Archives consist of materials relating to her activities as a theatrical-literary agent. These materials include books, business records, clippings, correspondence, financial papers, legal documents, photographs, programs, promotional materials, and scripts.

Among numerous scripts are those by Saul Bellow and Sam Shepard. Some of these works are originals, some are unpublished, and some are in several versions. These plays are supported by extensive correspondence discussing them and their production.

Correspondence also reveals Cole’s arrangements with many other playwrights and actors such as William Alfred, John Arden, Eric Bentley, Edward Bond, Bertolt Brecht (estate), Barbara Garson, Simon Gray, Sam Jaffe, Zero Mostel, and Luigi Pirandello (estate), among others.

The collection as a whole offers a remarkable look at the activities of a theatrical agency.

Toby Cole Letterhead

Toby Cole Letterhead

50 Features of Special Collections: The American River and a Lake with Many Names

October 28th, 2016 by Dawn Collings
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The American River does not flow directly from Lake Tahoe to the Sacramento River, but this map shows the south fork of the “Rio de los Americanos” with a direct path from what was then known as “Mountain Lake” into the “Rio Sacramento” past the town of “Nueva Helvetia”.  The Spanish names reflect that California was controlled by Mexico at the time this map was created in the early 1840s.  John Charles Fremont’s expedition across the western portion of North America included the region of the American River which would later become the center of the Gold Rush.

 

 

 

americanriverfullunder2mb

1845 Map of the American River Showing “Mountain Lake”

The naming of Lake Tahoe took many twists and turns that are reflected on early maps of California and the western states. In Fremont’s early surveys, the lake was simply named Mountain Lake.  Later, Charles Preuss, a cartographer working with Fremont, drew the lake as Lake Bonpland in homage to Aimé Bonpland, a French botanist and explorer of South America.

lbonpland

1848 Map of the Western States Showing “L. Bonpland” [Lake Bonpland]

In 1870, the lake was officially named “Lake Bigler” in honor of John Bigler, governor of California from 1852 to 1856.  However, Bigler was a strong secessionist during the Civil War, and having his name on the lake was unpopular.  The official name remained on maps published by the State of California until the California Legislature formally changed it to Lake Tahoe in 1945.

1853 Map of The United States Showing "Bigler L. [Lake]"

1853 Map of The United States Showing “Bigler L.” [Bigler Lake]

Here we have an 1849 map that is unique in referring to the lake as “Fremonts L.” [Fremont’s Lake].

1849 Map of the Gold Regions of California showing "Fremonts L." [Fremont's Lake]

1849 Map of the Gold Regions of California showing “Fremonts L.” [Fremont’s Lake]

This 1884 map of Central California is particularly interesting in that shows Lake Bigler and Lake Tahoe as being interchangeable names referring to the same body of water.

1884 Map Showing "Lake Bigler or Lake Tahoe"

1884 Map Showing “Lake Bigler or Lake Tahoe”

And finally we see the name Lake Tahoe returning to its Washo Native American beginnings meaning “big water” in this 1900 map issued by the California-Paris Exposition Commission of 1900.

1900 Map of California issued by the California-Paris Exposition Commission of 1900

Map of California issued by the California-Paris Exposition Commission of 1900

 

Information for this blog post comes from the gazetteer California Place Names; the Origin and Etymology of Current Geographical Names. A gazetteer is a geographical dictionary, and a collection of gazetteers in the Map Collection room help begin research for place names.

 

You can view these maps in the Map Collection room on the Lower Level of Shields Library, 1:00-5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

 

Sources:

Gudde, Erwin Gustav. California Place Names; the Origin and Etymology of Current Geographical Names. Rev. and Enl. 3d Ed., with Maps and Reference List of Obsolete Names.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 1969. Print.

Map showing “Mountain Lake”:

Frémont, John Charles, Edward Weber & Co, and United States. Congress. Senate. [Course of the American River from Lake Tahoe to Nueva Helvetia]. Washington, D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1845. Print.

Shields Library Map Collection Old Maps- (MAP G4301.H2 1845 .F7 Drawer 1 )

Map showing “L. Bonpland” [Lake Bonpland]:

Frémont, John Charles, Charles Preuss, and Edward Weber & Co. Map of Oregon and Upper California, from the Surveys of John Charles Frémont and Other Authorities. Washington, D.C.: Senate, 1848. Print.

Shields Library Map Collection Old Maps (MAP G4210 1848 .P7 )

Map showing “Fremonts L.” [Fremonts Lake]:

Wyld, James. Map of the Gold Regions of California. London:  s.n., 1849. Print.

Shields Library Map Collection (MAP G4300 1849 .W9 ) – reproduction.

Map showing “Lake Bigler”:

Goddard, George H., and Britton & Rey. Britton & Rey’s Map of the State of California. Berkeley, Calif.: Friends of the Bancroft Library, 1969. Print.

Shields Library Map Collection (MAP G4360 1857 .G6 ) – reproduction.

Map showing “Lake Bigler or Lake Tahoe”

Rand McNally Company. [Rand McNally Map of California]. Chicago, IL, 1884. Print.

Map of California issued by the California-Paris Exposition Commission of 1900

H.S. Crocker & Co, and California-Paris Exposition Commission of 1900. Map of California / Copyrighted by H.S. Crocker Co. San Francisco: California-Paris Exposition Commission of 1900, 1900. Print.

Post created by Dawn Collings & Kristoffer Landes

50 Features of Special Collections: Ruth Finney Papers

October 21st, 2016 by Sara Gunasekara
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This week we are highlighting the Ruth Finney Papers as part of our 50 Features of Special Collections series.

Ruth Finney (1898-1979) grew up in Downieville and Sacramento, California and attended San Jose Normal School where she received a teaching certificate in 1918. After substitute teaching in Sacramento for three months, she resigned to join the staff of the Sacramento Star as a reporter.

In 1922, Finney received statewide recognition for her reporting of the Argonaut Mine disaster in Jackson, California. She was transferred to the San Francisco Daily News and there received national attention for her coverage of President Warren G. Harding’s death at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco. As a result, she became the Washington, D.C. correspondent for the four California Scripps-Howard newspapers. During her first years in Washington, Ruth Finney covered the Teapot Dome Oil scandal, monitored the passage of the Boulder Canyon Project Act (which authorized the construction of Hoover Dam and the allocation of its resources), and investigated the corruption in the electric and gas utilities industry, for which she received a nomination for the Pulitzer Prize in 1931.

She began writing a weekly column, “Washington Calling,” in 1941, which contained news, political and economic analyses, and forecasts and was distributed to all Scripps-Howard newspapers. She wrote numerous magazine articles and was a member of the Washington Press Club. Though she partially retired in 1965, Finney continued writing her column through 1974.

The Ruth Finney Papers consist of materials related to her career as a newpaper reporter. This includes her correspondence, scrapbooks, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, photographs, research materials, legal documents, and personal mementos.

The diaries, spanning from 1916 to 1952, recount her experiences from age 18 as a student at San Jose Normal School, through her years as a Western correspondent at the Scripps-Howard Washington Alliance. She describes current events as well as reporting assignments, personal relationships, particularly with her mother and Robert S. Allen, and colleagues and acquaintances, most notably California Senator Hiram Johnson, Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Included in the manuscripts is a copy of Finney’s unpublished autobiography, Journey from the Star; her unpublished history of Downieville, Rogues and Riches; several unpublished plays; a musical, Now Is the Time; and many short stories. The feature articles appear in both draft and final form, and include her articles about Justice Department espionage agents written in 1927 at the encouragement of Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, and her articles about the women’s labor force in weapons factories during World War II.

All of the correspondence is incoming and has been divided into three groupings. The first contains letters from Hiram Johnson dating from August 1926 to September 1928, written during the height of the Boulder Dam filibuster. The second contains letters written between September 1944 and July 1945, pertaining to her husband’s (Robert S. Allen) war experiences and subsequent discharge after being wounded. The third group contains letters from editors, readers and politicians spanning the period from July 1917 to April 1978.

More information about Finney and the collection can be found in the finding aid here.

 Ruth Finney in front of the Washington Daily News office, 1933.


Ruth Finney in front of the Washington Daily News office, 1933.

50 Features of Special Collections: Henry Dart Greene Papers

October 13th, 2016 by Sara Gunasekara
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This week we are highlighting the Henry Dart Greene Papers as part of our 50 Features of Special Collections series.  Henry Dart Greene (1900-1978) was the son of noted architect Henry Mather Greene and his wife Emeline Dart Greene. His professional life spanned several careers: he served as the Executive Manager of the Feather River Project Association; conducted public relations campaigns for the American Fruit and Produce Auction Association; and ran his own film production company.

The Henry Dart Greene Papers contains photographs, motion picture films and a small amount of personal and business papers. The photographs date from 1914 to the late 1960s, and are a mix of personal and professional subjects. Images from Greene’s years at UC Berkeley and of his wife Ruth Haight Greene’s childhood in Sacramento are the earliest ones in the collection. The collection includes photographs from Argentina, where Greene worked with the Argentine Fruit Distributors from 1928 to 1931 and from his public relations work with the American Fruit and Produce Auction Association (AFPAA) from 1933 to 1941.

The collection also contains films made by Greene between 1933 and 1970. The films include footage of Eastern fruit auctions, including New York City and Chicago during the 1930’s; the California State Fair; and films made for the Feather River Project Association. As part of the California Audiovisual Preservation Project, we digitized five of Greene’s films. The films, listed below, can be viewed on the Internet Archive.

 

California Scenes and Other Sites, circa 1933-1934.

Packing fruit in California and Other Scenes, circa 1934-1935.

Sacramento River Association and Nevada County, Calif., 1936.

California Waterama: The Story of the Feather River Project, 1957.

Oroville Dam Site, 1961.

 

You can find out more information about Henry Dart Greene and the collection via the finding aid here.

 Henry D. Greene outside California State Capitol, circa 1925-1928.

Henry D. Greene outside California State Capitol, circa 1925-1928.

50 Features of Special Collections: Will of Ximenes Petri, Tudela, Spain, 1287 September 13.

October 7th, 2016 by Jenny Hodge
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This week’s feature highlights a 1287 A.D. Will of Ximenes (“Eximinus”) Petri, conveying to the Veruela Monastery (“Monasterio Berolensi”) his vineyards and buildings in Tudela, and detailing the boundaries of the property. According to the Will the donation was for the benefit of the souls of his father, mother and himself. Besides the original manuscript written in Latin there is also a typed transcription, photocopy and maps of the Tudela and the Kingdom of Navarre. The Veruela Abbey or Monastery was founded in 1146 by Pedro de Atarés and is a Cistercian Abbey. The monastery had a major role in the development of viticulture and wineries in the area.

The Cistercian monastery of Veruela, is still in existence and is located at the foot of Moncayo, between the regions of Borja and Tarazona and Moncayo. There you can also visit the Museo del Vino del Campo de Borja and learn about the regions cultivation of vines, production and aging of wines as well as view the tools and machinery used during the process.
Will of Ximenes Petri

Will of Ximenes Petri

Stop by Special Collections if you are interested in learning more about our holdings in viticulture and enology.

50 Features of Special Collections: Direction of the Road, Artist’s books

September 30th, 2016 by Jenny Hodge
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This week we are highlighting one of our artists’ books Direction of the Road by Ursula K. Le Guin. The story is narrated by an oak tree on the side of the road. As someone approaches the tree it grows in size and as the viewer walks away the tree diminishes in size. As time passes, modes of transport and traffic increase forcing the tree to work extra hard to grow and shrink in quick succession.

The story by Ursula K. Le Guin was published in 1974, however, we are highlighting an artists’ book published in 2007 by Foolscap Press.  The story is printed on linen paper with occasional pressed leaves which makes a sort of rustling sound as you turn the pages. The book is presented in a portfolio box with an original woodcut illustration and a mirror made of plastic tubing to view the image.

“The art on this portfolio box is an original woodcut by Aaron Johnson. It is done in a form called anamorphic art … Aaron Johnson’s woodcut … casts the viewer into an active role in relation to the art and, most important for the story, it allows the image freedom of movement. The image may be viewed by removing the mirrored cylinder from its elastic stays and standing it on end within the printed circle on the woodcut. The “corrected” image can then be seen reflected in the mirror. The woodcut, handprinted by Aaron Johnson at Foolscap Press, is limited to 150 copies, signed by the artist.”–Colophon to portfolio box.

The beauty of an artists’ book is that not only is the story a work of art but also the form the book is presented in. Upon approaching the portfolio the reader becomes part of the story watching as the tree grows and then shrinks as the reader retreats. This presentation mirrors the idea of the story and further encourages the reader to reflect on differences in perception.

dor-blog

For more artists’ books in Special Collections look for the Fine Press and Book Arts Collection.

 

50 Features of Special Collections: Harry Hazen Papers on the University Farm

September 21st, 2016 by Sara Gunasekara

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As today marks the first day of instruction for the 2016 Fall Quarter, we’ve chosen to highlight the collection of Harry Hazen, a student who enrolled at the University Farm (now UC Davis) exactly one hundred years ago in the Fall of 1916.

The Harry Hazen Papers on the University Farm document student life during the earliest years of the Davis campus. The collection, which includes a scrapbook of photographs and memorabilia from 1916-1918, the booklet “Harry and I on the University Farm,” Hazen’s 1918 diploma, two family photographs, as well as booklets on apiculture, was donated in April 2016 by Hazen’s granddaughter.

Harry Edward Hazen was born in 1897 in Los Angeles, California to Reverend E.A. and Eleanor Hazen. He attended Los Angeles Polytechnic High School, graduated in 1915, and attended the University of California beginning in the fall of 1916. In 1918, Hazen was awarded his diploma from the University of California Farm, College of Agriculture. He then moved to Modesto, California, and became a commercial beekeeper. In 1920, Hazen married Ethel Thamer Blackburn; their daughter Lorraine was born in 1923. Later that year, the Hazen family returned to Los Angeles, where Harry founded the Hazen Hardwood Flooring Company in North Hollywood. Harry Hazen remained in Los Angeles until his death in 1953.

The photo shown below is found on one of the first pages of the scrapbook. Taken on September 19, 1916 it shows the student body in front of West Hall, a dormitory which was located where the Memorial Union now stands.

Stay tuned throughout the year as we’ll be posting other items from Harry’s scrapbook while we look back at campus one hundred years ago.

First Day of School, September 19, 1916.

First Day of School, September 19, 1916.